Remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah still raining on Philippines

Apr 15, 2014
This visible image shows the remnant clouds from former Tropical Depression Peipah located over the central and southern Philippines. It was taken from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite on April 15 at 5:44 a.m. EDT. Credit: NRL/NASA/NOAA

Several regions in the south and central Philippines have flood advisories as the remnants of now dissipated Tropical Depression Peipah continue to linger over the country. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite got a look at the remnant clouds from its orbit in space on April 15.

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a look at Peipah's remnant clouds on April 15 at 5:44 a.m. EDT. VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans. The VIIRS image showed scattered and clouds over the central and southern Philippines.

On April 15 in the Central and Western Visayas region, and the Bicol and Mimaropa regions of the Philippines a general flood advisory was in effect. The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) expects scattered light to occasionally moderate rain showers and thunderstorms throughout those regions today, April 15.

A general flood advisory is also in effect for Eastern Visayas, where PAGASA expects moderate to occasional heavy rain and thunderstorms from Peipah's remnants. In the Zamboanga peninsula of the Mindanao Region, PAGASA is calling for cloudy skies with moderate rains and thunderstorms.

Peipah's last observed center of circulation was near 10.4 north and 126.9 east, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Peipah has dissipated and is no longer suspect for re-development over the next 24 hours.

Explore further: NASA sees remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah over Southern Philippines

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