Google to shield students from digital ads

Apr 30, 2014

Google will no longer try to sell ads based on personal information collected about students using a suite of products tailored for schools.

The changes announced Wednesday revise some of the policies governing Google's "Apps for Education" products.

Among other things, Google Inc. says it will no longer scan texts of Gmails sent through Apps for Education for clues about students' interests. The scanning would give the company a better idea about what kinds of ads to show them.

Google is also removing an option that allowed to show Gmail ads when students were using Apps for Education. The Mountain View, Calif., company had been automatically blocking the ads unless administrator changed the controls.

More than 30 million students, teachers and administrators use the Apps for Education suite.

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