Google challenges nonprofits on ideas to use Glass

April 22, 2014 by Brett Zongker
Google challenges nonprofits on ideas to use Glass

Google has a challenge for U.S. nonprofits.

On Tuesday, the tech giant is asking to propose ideas for how to use the Web-connected eyewear Google Glass in their work. Five charities that propose the best ideas by May 20 will get a free pair of the glasses, a trip to Google for training and a $25,000 grant to help make their project a reality.

Already, Google has been testing Glass with nonprofits in their field work.

Conservationists at the Washington-based World Wildlife Fund have been using Google Glass for hands-free field research. In Nepal, a research officer has been using Google Glass to track, photograph and monitor rhinos to help protect them from poaching in areas that are inaccessible by vehicles.

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Explore further: Google Glass distribution begins this week

More information: Giving Through Glass: g.co/givingthroughglass

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