Another fireball explodes over Russia

April 21, 2014 by Jason Major, Universe Today

Why does Russia seem to get so many bright meteors? Well at 6.6 million square miles it's by far the largest country in the world plus, with dashboard-mounted cameras being so commonplace (partly to help combat insurance fraud) statistically it just makes sense that Russians would end up seeing more meteors, and then be able to share the experience with the rest of the world!

This is exactly what happened early this morning, April 19 (local time), when a bright fireball flashed in the skies over Murmansk, located on the Kola Peninsula in northwest Russia near the border of Finland. Luckily not nearly as large or powerful as the Chelyabinsk meteor event from February 2013, no sound or air blast from this fireball has been reported and nobody was injured. Details on the object aren't yet known… it could be a meteor (most likely) or it could be re-entering . The video above, some of which was captured by Alexandr Nesterov from his dashcam, shows the object dramatically lighting up the early morning sky.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

One Russian astronomer suggests this bolide may have been part of the debris that results in the Lyrid meteor shower, which peaks on April 22-23.

Explore further: Stunning Lyrid meteor over earth at night

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4 comments

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Rute
3 / 5 (6) Apr 21, 2014
One other reason why the Russians have good chances of getting footage of meteors is because it is common for people there to keep a camera on the car's dashboard to prove innocence in cases of car crash related insurance fraud allegations.

Anyways, I'm glad we're getting actual footage of big meteors. That's much cooler than hearing the ever recurring boring stories of "top secret military expermients" or "alien visitors" which these phenomena tend to be explained as by certain people.
Rute
5 / 5 (1) Apr 21, 2014
For the people who gave one star rating to my comment, here's further information about the dashboard camera use in Russia: http://www.wired....sh-cams/
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (9) Apr 21, 2014
One other reason why the Russians have good chances of getting footage of meteors is because it is common for people there to keep a camera on the car's dashboard to prove innocence in cases of car crash related insurance fraud allegations.

Maybe people downvoted because you commented without reading the article. It says exactly the same thing in the first paragraph.
Rute
5 / 5 (8) Apr 21, 2014
One other reason why the Russians have good chances of getting footage of meteors is because it is common for people there to keep a camera on the car's dashboard to prove innocence in cases of car crash related insurance fraud allegations.

Maybe people downvoted because you commented without reading the article. It says exactly the same thing in the first paragraph.


Heh, that's a good catch. I actually managed to miss the part of the article where that was stated. I have a bad habit of glancing through the articles.

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