Duke Energy says it needs time to clean coal ash

Apr 02, 2014 by Michael Biesecker

Duke Energy's chief executive says the company is putting together a detailed plan to clean up nearly three dozen coal ash pits across the state.

But Lynn Good told a business group Wednesday that it wouldn't happen overnight.

Good's comments came two months after a massive spill at Duke's Eden plant, which coated a 70 mile stretch of the Dean River in .

She says the spill never threatened the drinking water of communities along the river, and that the overall water quality of the river is back to normal.

But a senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center, Frank Holleman, disagreed. He says the river is still seriously polluted with coal ash and heavy metals.

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