Closing arguments delayed in Apple-Samsung trial (Update)

Apr 28, 2014 by Paul Elias
In this Nov. 22, 2013 file photo, a man walks past banners advertising smartphones by Samsung and Apple at a mobile phone shop in Seoul, South Korea. The high-stakes battle between the world's largest smartphone makers is scheduled to wrap up this week after a monthlong trial that has pulled the curtain back on just how very cutthroat the competition is between Apple and Samsung. Closing arguments in the patent-infringement case are scheduled to begin Monday, April 28, 2014 with the two tech giants accusing each other, once again, of ripping off designs and features. At stake: $2 billion if Samsung loses, a few hundred million if Apple loses. (AP Photo/Yonhap, Han Sang-kyun, File)

A federal court on Monday delayed closing arguments by one day in the patent infringement trial involving Apple and Samsung because of an appeals court ruling in another case on a related issue.

Dueling expert witnesses were called back to the stand in a federal courtroom in San Jose to discuss whether the ruling in a legal dispute between Apple and Motorola has any effect on the Apple-Samsung trial.

The Federal U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., on Friday upheld a federal judge's legal definition of Apple's so-called "quick links" patent at issue in the dispute between Apple and Motorola.

In Silicon Valley, Apple is accusing Samsung of infringing the patent that automatically turns phone numbers and email addresses into links, enabling users to make calls and send messages with a single click.

U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh said the matter was best left for the jury to decide.

Lawyers will begin delivering closing arguments on Tuesday, with jurors to begin deliberations when the arguments conclude.

The high-stakes battle between the world's largest smartphone makers has exposed the cutthroat competition between the two companies. Each accused the other of ripping off designs and features as they fought for supremacy of the $330 billion worldwide market.

Apple is seeking $2.2 billion, while Samsung is asking for considerably less.

In this Jan. 17, 2014 file photo, Apple CEO Tim Cook, right, and China Mobile's chairman Xi Guohua are silhouetted against a screen showing iPhone products as they applaud during a promotional event that marks the opening day of sales of China Mobile's 4G iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c at a shop of the world's largest mobile phone operator in Beijing, China. The high-stakes battle between the world's largest smartphone makers is scheduled to wrap up this week after a monthlong trial that has pulled the curtain back on just how very cutthroat the competition is between Apple and Samsung. Closing arguments in the patent-infringement case are scheduled to begin Monday, April 28 with the two tech giants accusing each other, once again, of ripping off designs and features. At stake: $2 billion if Samsung loses, a few hundred million if Apple loses. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan, File)

The judge read jurors 53 pages of instructions on Monday explaining how to decide blame and calculate damages.

Teams of attorneys on both sides have spent the month trying to poke holes in obscure and bureaucratic patent legal claims, while keeping the eight jurors engaged.

Drawing the most attention in the courtroom and the media are insider emails and meeting presentations documenting the frustration each company faced as they competed for market share.

Less than a year after Apple unveiled its iPhone in 2007 combining a web browser, music player and phone in one touch-screen device, Samsung officials noted they were quickly losing customers.

In this March 27, 2014 file photo, an employee shows Samsung's Galaxy S5 smartphone at a mobile phone shop in Seoul, South Korea. The high-stakes battle between the world's largest smartphone makers is scheduled to wrap up this week after a monthlong trial that has pulled the curtain back on just how very cutthroat the competition is between Apple and Samsung. Closing arguments in the patent-infringement case are scheduled to begin Monday, April 28 with the two tech giants accusing each other, once again, of ripping off designs and features. At stake: $2 billion if Samsung loses, a few hundred million if Apple loses. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)

But Samsung fought back, using Google's Android system, offering less expensive smartphones with larger screens.

Throughout the three years of litigation, Samsung's market share has grown. One of every three smartphones sold last year was a Samsung, now the market leader. Apple, with a typically higher price, was second, with about 15 percent of the global market.

Two years ago, a federal jury found Samsung was infringing on Apple patents. Samsung was ordered to pay about $900 million, but it is has appealed the judgment and has been allowed to continue selling products using the technology.

Explore further: Jury set to decide how much Samsung owes Apple (Update)

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