Air Force launches spy satellite from Florida

Apr 10, 2014

The Air Force has launched a new spy satellite.

An unmanned blasted off Thursday from Cape Canaveral with a satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office. No details about the classified satellite were divulged. It's intended for national security.

The Atlas rocket should have flown two weeks ago. But crucial radar-tracking equipment was damaged a day before the planned March 25 liftoff. An electrical short overheated the unit. Because repairs continue, the Air Force used backup radar to monitor Thursday afternoon's launch.

The radar accident also delayed a private SpaceX launch, now targeted for Monday.

SpaceX has a fresh load of supplies for the International Space Station. NASA is using private companies to keep the orbiting lab stocked.

Explore further: Crucial radar outage scrubs Cape Canaveral launches for several weeks

More information: NRO: www.nro.gov

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