Zuckerberg says US government threat to Internet

Mar 13, 2014 by Rob Lever
Facebook's 29-year-old billionaire creator Mark Zuckerberg arrives on the opening day of the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, on February 24, 2014

Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg said Thursday he had called President Barack Obama to complain that the US government is undermining confidence in the Internet with vast, secret surveillance programs.

In a post on his own Facebook page, the founder of the huge social network expressed anger towards Washington, in what appeared to be a reaction to new revelations about US surveillance.

"I've called President Obama to express my frustration over the damage the government is creating for all of our future," he wrote.

"Unfortunately, it seems like it will take a very long time for true full reform."

Zuckerberg's comments come amid growing tensions between the tech sector and US administration over leaked documents describing the vast surveillance ability of the secretive National Security Agency and other intelligence services.

"The Internet works because most people and companies do the same. We work together to create this secure environment and make our shared space even better for the world," he said.

"This is why I've been so confused and frustrated by the repeated reports of the behavior of the US government. When our engineers work tirelessly to improve security, we imagine we're protecting you against criminals, not our own government."

He added: "The US government should be the champion for the Internet, not a threat. They need to be much more transparent about what they're doing, or otherwise people will believe the worst."

The comments came a day after a report citing leaked NSA documents said the spy agency had imitated a Facebook server to inject malware into computers to expand its intelligence collection capacity.

The report by former Guardian reporter Glenn Greenwald said the NSA had developed malware that allows it to collect data automatically from millions of computers worldwide.

Some of the documents leaked by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden in recent months have said the NSA had access to servers of tech giants such as Facebook, Google and Yahoo.

These companies have strongly denied giving any access except under a legal requirement, and have said more transparency about the programs could reassure their customers.

An agreement in January allowed the companies to publish broad details of government data requests, but many activists have called for far more information.

Zuckerberg, in his posting Thursday, reiterated his call for more openness.

"As the world becomes more complex and governments everywhere struggle, trust in the Internet is more important today than ever," he said.

"To keep the Internet strong, we need to keep it secure. That's why at Facebook we spend a lot of our energy making our services and the whole Internet safer and more secure.

"We encrypt communications, we use secure protocols for traffic, we encourage people to use multiple factors for authentication and we go out of our way to help fix issues we find in other people's services."

Zuckerberg's comments drew a quick response online, with 73,000 people hitting the "like" button within an hour and more than 8,000 "shares."

Dozens of people commented on Facebook, mostly to praise Zuckerberg.

"Thank you Mark! It's good to know that you do have us in mind first!" one Facebook member wrote. But another warned: "I hope this is sincere and not like Google's 'don't be evil' two-faced mantra."

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User comments : 21

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Caliban
5 / 5 (6) Mar 13, 2014
Hahahaha!

This reveals Zuck's hypocrisy quite clearly.

Note that he doesn't say what it is that really bothers him about gubmint spying --the fact that they are getting all that sweet, monetized information without Zuck&Co getting a single cent in profits for the sale of that data.

Were it not for the serious threat this poses in terms of the violation of individual rights, I would applaud the spy apparatus for the ripoff, just because of the discomfiture it causes the Zucky and his pals.

TheGhostofOtto1923
3.7 / 5 (3) Mar 13, 2014
Hopefully he will call russia, china, iran, turkey, north korea et al and complain to them as well. In todays world freedom exists in inverse proportion to security.
Bonia
Mar 13, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Lex Talonis
5 / 5 (4) Mar 13, 2014
Ahhh Mark "Suck A Terd" - and HIS Facebook fiascos, that he and his cronies have created for everyone that uses their program and or the sites that they link up too....

Privacy settings? Scam artist settings.....

Trust and Privacy?

Mark Suck A Terd - they store millions of bits of cross linked data on each and every user - this guy runs one of the most sinister business's ever created.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS MAY APPLY is the documentary looking closer at the small print that accompanies user agreements, and how these contracts are used to manipulate users into signing away their rights. We look at the film, plus its trailer, and get the story behind the production with director Cullen Hoback in this BYOD full length episode.

https://www.youtu...iQF_Y_cg
Returners
5 / 5 (3) Mar 13, 2014
Zuckerberg is actually the biggest threat to the internet.
ziphead
5 / 5 (2) Mar 13, 2014
"Zuckerberg's comments drew a quick response online, with 73,000 people hitting the 'like' button within an hour..."

Now, that's pretty sad.
But then again, good ol' Zuckie can create 'likes' for himself out of thin air if he wants to.
Sinister1812
5 / 5 (4) Mar 14, 2014
I find it annoying how heaps of people on Facebook worship this guy like a cult leader. He's kinda arrogant. Facebook has not been good for online privacy either.
alfie_null
5 / 5 (4) Mar 14, 2014
He should complain? All the attention shifted to the government dilutes the scrutiny his company should be subject to.

My suggestion: he use his influence to back legislation giving me, individuals, U.S. citizens, control over information regarding ourselves. Giving all of us the right to know who collects what about us. Requiring our permission prior to making it available to third parties. Per each instance. Giving us the right to have it deleted.
antialias_physorg
4.4 / 5 (7) Mar 14, 2014
This guy just started his carrier with breaching the Internet security and he continues in it with breaching of Internet privacy. Taking his advices seriously it´s like setting the fox to keep the geese..

So...if murdere X calls murderer Y "a murderer" then that means murderer Y is not a murderer?

Whatever Zuckerberg may be regarding internet privacy* : he's completely right calling the US governemnt out for being a threat to the internet.

(*and anyone who has a facebook account but moans about having their data abused should get facepalmed until it bleeds)

Rimino
Mar 14, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (2) Mar 14, 2014
US governemnt out for being a threat to the internet
The US only wants to prevent these sorts of things:

"Target admitted it failed to take immediate actions after its security software detected a possible security breach in November 2013, thus resulting to the biggest data breach compromising and affecting data of more than 100 million customers."

"a Malaysia Airlines jetliner are looking at 'sabotage or hihacking', after examining military radar."

"U.S. intelligence agencies traced a recent cyber intrusion into a sensitive infrastructure database to the Chinese government or military cyber warriors... The compromise of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' National Inventory of Dams (NID) is raising new concerns that China is preparing to conduct a future cyber attack against the national electrical power grid"

-So how would they prevent these things in eurodisneyworld? Have a parade? What if it's raining then? What would eurodisneypeople do THEN aa? Build a maginot wall??
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Mar 14, 2014
The US only wants to prevent these sorts of things:
...and that's why they are spying on allies (including their heads of state)...and you?

Are they really trying to get terrorist plot information from evesdropping on Merkel's phoneline? Really?
nowhere
5 / 5 (1) Mar 14, 2014
The US only wants to prevent these sorts of things:

Only?
In Otto's world the US is incapable of corruption. I for one would love to live in his fantasy world.
ryggesogn2
2.5 / 5 (2) Mar 14, 2014
Every govt is threat to the internet.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Mar 14, 2014
I for one would love to live in his fantasy world.

Well...he referenced 'eurodisneyworld'...he probably doesn't know where disneyworld had its origins.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (1) Mar 14, 2014
The US only wants to prevent these sorts of things:

Only?
In Otto's world the US is incapable of corruption. I for one would love to live in his fantasy world.
No sir. In your world no one else is capable of malevolence. We call this eurodisneyland, which had its origins in the land of californication, another fantasy realm. Many euros and nipponese love the atmosphere. But they already had lots of castles and fairy princesses and leprechauns and all .
antialias_physorg
1 / 5 (1) Mar 14, 2014
Using methods that create more fanatics than they catch isn't smart. (Unless you are someone who profits from that fear - like someone who is heavily invested in an, oh, let's say, ...military-industrial complex?)
ryggesogn2
1 / 5 (1) Mar 14, 2014
Is anti referring to Mad Ludwig's castle as the model for Disneyland?

What methods are creating more fanatics?
Has the European accommodation of Islam made them less fanatical?
Jews have been driven out of Malmo. A Dutch film maker was murdered and a Dutch govt politician exiled.
But I'm sure the Germans have no trouble with Muslims demanding public calls to prayer or...

TheGhostofOtto1923
3 / 5 (2) Mar 15, 2014
Using methods that create more fanatics
Overpopulation creates fanatics. Religion tells them who to hate.
military-industrial complex
You mean like Russia? Their military industrial complex is reaping dividends by stealing chunks of land from their neighbors.

Should this be allowed? How else to apply pressure than with a superior military threat? What could have prevented Germany from stealing the Sudetenland and Poland in 1936? A maginot wall? What keeps people without tickets out of eurodisneyworld?

These are questions you need to consider before reaching a rational conclusion about the need for a strong proactive military.

It's interesting - kruschev gave the Crimea to the Ukraine in 1954. This was easy because the peninsula was largely depopulated by hitler and Stalin. This enabled the minority Russian pop to swell and dominate, setting the stage for this conflict at exactly the time when the US military is set to shrink to pre-ww2 levels.

More evidence of Planning.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3 / 5 (2) Mar 15, 2014
"Well why don't we just ignore them? -asks goofy antialias-mouse. "My t-shirt says 'What if they threw a war and nobody came?"

That's the Thing with this sort of Planning - if you refuse to respond you WILL be overrun and you WILL be annihilated. Empire gives you absolutely no other choice.

They've been doing this since before babylon exiled the Jews. They've gotten very very good at it.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Mar 15, 2014
Has the European accommodation of Islam made them less fanatical?

I dunno...how often do you see them chanting "death to america" vs. "death to europe"? Certainly the european way is by no means optimal. There is still WAY too much economy-colonialism going on. It's not just the US that needs to rethink its approach to those it deems to be 'terrorists'. If you look at your history books you will notice that ALL those who anyone calls a 'terrorist' are so because you shafted them badly at one or several times in the past. They didn't turn into rabid fanatics of themselves.

It's time to realize this and take responsibility for past wrongs.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (1) Mar 15, 2014
Meanwhile as aa rides the flying dumbo attraction, Russia enters adventureland.

"SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine — Russian forces backed by helicopter gunships and armored vehicles Saturday took control of a village near the border with Crimea on the eve of a referendum on whether the region should seek annexation by Moscow, Ukrainian officials said.

"The action in Strilkove appeared to be the first move outside Crimea, where Russian forces have been in effective control since late last month. There were no reports of gunfire or injuries. The incident raises tensions already at a high level before Sunday's referendum."

-Is the ostrich a Disney character? Naw, too depressing.
http://youtu.be/3...6FUwRgoM

Wheeeeeeeee.
Lex Talonis
5 / 5 (2) Mar 15, 2014
Suck-A-Terd is so unscrupulous - LOL

"They trust me with their information? The dumb fucks."

"Oh Marky, Marky - We love you - Facebook is so wonderful" - the sheeple bleat - while he and his cronies defraud them and sell their information to everyone and anyone.