Women's jobs are poorer paid, less flexible and more stressful

Mar 04, 2014

Women's jobs are poorer paid, less flexible, more stressful, and offer fewer promotion opportunities than men's, a large international study has found.

Researchers say that the results disprove the theory that have voluntarily traded less high-powered jobs in order to have more flexibility for their responsibilities at home.

Professor Haya Stier, of Tel Aviv University, and Professor Meir Yaish, University of Haifa, analysed on the working lives of 8,500 and 9,000 women in 27 .

The countries studied were: Australia, Belgium (Flanders), Bulgaria, Canada, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Latvia, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Russia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, and the USA.

In a paper published in the journal Work, Employment and Society they looked at how those surveyed responded to questions about their jobs, and found:

  • When asked if they or their employer decided at what time they started and ended work, how they organised their schedule, and whether they took time off work, men scored 0.148 points (15%) higher.
  • On a scale of 1-5, on average men gave answers that were 0.215 points higher (8%) than women's when asked about their income and opportunities for promotion.
  • On a scale of 1-5, on average men gave answers that were 0.159 points (5%) lower than women's when asked about how stressful and exhausting the work was.
  • Men gave answers that were 0.084 (2 %) points higher than women's when asked about how interesting they found their work, how independently they could work and how much scope they had to improve their skills.
  • Men gave answers that were 0.062 points (2%) lower than women's when asked about job security.

Only in the area of physical condition did men score their work worse, saying it was more physically arduous and dangerous, by 0.275 points (8%).

"The findings show that women lag behind men on most dimensions of job quality," say the researchers. "This result runs counter to the expectation that women's occupations compensate for their low wages and limited opportunities for promotion by providing better employment conditions.

"The findings indicate that women enjoy hardly any advantage over men in the labour market. Women lag behind men on most employment dimensions: their jobs offer lower salaries and fewer opportunities for advancement, but also lower job security, worse job content, less time autonomy and worse emotional conditions."

The research "does not support the claim that women enjoy a more relaxed and convenient work environment to compensate for their lack of achievement."

However the researchers also found that the more women in a profession or trade the closer their working conditions came to men's in most aspects of work.

Explore further: Reasons for becoming self-employed in later life vary by gender, culture

More information: The journal paper is available online: www.uva-aias.net/uploaded_file… P121-Stier,Yaish.pdf

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Men support cracking glass ceiling

Nov 12, 2013

Male workers appear to support women becoming CEOs even more than female workers do, finds new research on the proverbial glass ceiling and job satisfaction in six formerly socialist countries.

In job market, social contacts help men, not women

Aug 15, 2011

When it comes to finding a job, who you know is as important as what you know. Work experience generally helps people foster the kinds of personal contacts that can lead someone to new career opportunities, but a study from ...

Recommended for you

Why are UK teenagers skipping school?

Dec 18, 2014

Analysis of the results of a large-scale survey reveals the extent of truancy in English secondary schools and sheds light on the mental health of the country's teens.

Fewer lectures, more group work

Dec 18, 2014

Professor Cees van der Vleuten from Maastricht University is a Visiting Professor at Wits University who believes that learning should be student centred.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

ArtflDgr
not rated yet Mar 04, 2014
they proved nothing..
as opinion given by the men is not a measurable fact.
they may get less, but believe they have more
or get more and believe they have less.

actually measuring or testing would be nice.
but that would ruin their proof...
of course, their proof is more important to feminist ideology than science
but ideology is always more important than science
or those jesuits would never have petitions the pope to block gallileo
and feminists would nevr have petitioned the state to block what they dont like.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.