Survival box developed for collecting cyanobacteria

March 20, 2014
MaCuMBA Steering Committee members at the third steering committee meeting in Lisbon, Portugal.

The MaCuMBA (Marine Microorganisms: Cultivation Methods for Improving their Biotechnological Applications) project held its third Steering Committee meeting in Lisbon, Portugal, from 13-14 February 2014. MaCuMBA is a four-year EC Seventh Framework Programme (FP7)-funded project that aims to uncover the untold diversity of marine microbes using cultivation-dependent strategies.

It was agreed at the meeting that collected by MaCuMBA partners will be screened for useful biocompounds and will be used to test new cultivation methods and technologies. MaCuMBA partner Cyano Biotech will be using samples provided by other partners to test new robotic equipment it is developing. To help partners collect these samples, Cyano Biotech have developed a "survival box", which contains everything that is needed for collecting cyanobacteria.

Prof Lucas Stal, MaCuMBA project coordinator, said: "The survival box will be a very useful tool for the MaCuMBA . Partners going on expeditions to interesting locations will take the box with them to collect new samples. I hope to use it during expeditions to the Red Sea in May and to the tropical Atlantic Ocean on the research vessel Pelagia in September."

It was also decided at the meeting that all strains of microorganisms collected during MaCuMBA should be made available online as soon as possible. Algae and cyanobacteria collected during the will be stored in the Roscoff Culture Collection (RCC) and all other organisms will be kept in the Leibniz-Institut Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH (German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures (DSMZ)).

During the meeting, the Steering Committee considered plans for the 2014 MaCuMBA General Assembly, which will be held in Cadiz, Spain, from 22-23 September. The committee also discussed the planned industry stakeholder meeting, which will take place in November 2014 in Madrid, Spain. This event will be jointly organised with the Micro B3 ( and PharmaSea ( projects. 

Explore further: Think pink! Success of pink bacteria in oceans of the world

More information: For more information about MaCuMBA, visit:

Related Stories

Think pink! Success of pink bacteria in oceans of the world

July 19, 2012

Marine bacteria of the Roseobacter clade are found to be spread widely throughout the oceans of this planet from the tropics to as far as Antarctica. They live freely in the water, in sediments and as symbiotic partners of ...

EU-project on deep-sea organisms

February 15, 2013

The collaborative project PharmaSea will bring European researchers to some of the deepest, coldest and hottest places on the planet. Scientists from the UK, Belgium, Norway, Spain, Ireland, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and ...

Sun, water, CO2 and algae: A recipe for biofuel?

September 25, 2013

Plant-based biofuels were initially hailed as the answer to all problems posed by traditional fossil fuels. Supply is unlimited and they are also neutral to emissions harmful to the environment also. But using plants has ...

Recommended for you

Scientists overcome key CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing hurdle

December 1, 2015

Researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT have engineered changes to the revolutionary CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing system that significantly cut down on "off-target" ...

Study finds 'rudimentary' empathy in macaques

December 1, 2015

(—A pair of researchers with Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Université Lyon, in France has conducted a study that has shown that macaques have at least some degree of empathy towards their fellow ...

Which came first—the sponge or the comb jelly?

December 1, 2015

Bristol study reaffirms classical view of early animal evolution. Whether sponges or comb jellies (also known as sea gooseberries) represent the oldest extant animal phylum is of crucial importance to our understanding of ...

Trap-jaw ants exhibit previously unseen jumping behavior

December 1, 2015

A species of trap-jaw ant has been found to exhibit a previously unseen jumping behavior, using its legs rather than its powerful jaws. The discovery makes this species, Odontomachus rixosus, the only species of ant that ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.