Super-resolution laser machining possible

Mar 05, 2014
Researchers have discovered that it is possible to remove atoms from a surface using ultraviolet lasers, and confining the interaction to the atomic scale. Credit: Chris Baldwin

A newly discovered natural phenomenon shows that light could be used to pick apart a substance atom by atom, with new avenues for nano-scale diamond devices, as identified this week by Australian researchers in Nature Communications.

"Lasers are known to be very precise at cutting and drilling materials on a small scale – less than the width of a human hair, in fact – but on the atomic scale they have notoriously poor resolution," says lead researcher Associate Professor Richard Mildren.

"If we can harness lasers at higher resolutions, the opportunities at the atomic level are tremendous, especially for future nano-scale devices in data storage, quantum computers, nano-sensors and high-power on-chip lasers."

Current lasers separate materials through super heating of the surface at the focus of the beam. Although it has been in widespread use in industries such as in car manufacturing, this technology has severe limitations especially when looking to address cutting edge fabrication challenges in nano-devices.

Through their research, Mildren and Macquarie University colleagues Andrew Lehmann and Carlo Bradac have now discovered that it is possible to remove atoms from a surface, using ultraviolet lasers, and confining the interaction to the . The phenomenon is found to completely avoid the heat generation problem that has previously restricted the ability to make very small precise cuts.

"So far we have used the technique to demonstrate structures in diamond of size about 20 nanometers, which is the size of large molecules," says Mildren.

"However, the technique looks highly promising for doing much better, enabling manipulation of surfaces with the ultimate single atom precision, or more than a ten thousand times smaller than that possible by standard laser machining techniques."

Explore further: Researchers move an atom inside a crystal and investigate its function

More information: "Two-photon polarization-selective etching of emergent nano-structures on diamond surfaces," Nature Communications, 4 March 2014, A. Lehmann, C. Bradac and R.P. Mildren, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms4341

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New scientific research reveals diamonds aren't forever

Jul 18, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- In a paper published in the US journal Optical Materials Express this week, Macquarie University researchers show that even the earth's hardest naturally occurring material, the diamond, is not ...

Recommended for you

The electric slide dance of DNA knots

16 minutes ago

DNA has the nasty habit of getting tangled and forming knots. Scientists study these knots to understand their function and learn how to disentangle them (e.g. useful for gene sequencing techniques). Cristian ...

A new multi-bit 'spin' for MRAM storage

23 hours ago

Interest in magnetic random access memory (MRAM) is escalating, thanks to demand for fast, low-cost, nonvolatile, low-consumption, secure memory devices. MRAM, which relies on manipulating the magnetization ...

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

peter_trypsteen
2.5 / 5 (2) Mar 05, 2014
Amazing, single-atom precision would maybe make 3D printing things with atomic precision possible. All sorts of devices could be made really small and efficient.
Scottingham
1 / 5 (1) Mar 05, 2014
I wonder if this could be used to engineer really efficient and novel catalysts
flashgordon
3 / 5 (2) Mar 05, 2014
I've always felt that electromagnetic technologies are the way for nanomanufacturing(even all the way back to the early 1990s when I noticed some Japanese scientists/engineers tried to point this out to Eric Drexler); now, it's starting to really come around!

There was of course the exciting announcement just a week or so ago about nano-tweezers; there's also the African discovery of shaped laser waveforms. This stuff is getting cool!
TheGhostofOtto1923
3.7 / 5 (3) Mar 05, 2014
Casting, milling, stamping, and forging will soon enough be replaced by growing and printing, molecule by molecule, at breathtaking speeds.
Bonia
Mar 05, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.