Space station awaits for Russian craft after delay

Mar 27, 2014

A Russian spacecraft carrying three astronauts is on track to arrive at the International Space Station after a delay.

Docking with the orbiting outpost was set for Thursday evening.

The trio blasted off from Kazakhstan on Wednesday on what was supposed to be a six-hour "fast track" to the space station. But an engine burn intended to adjust the Soyuz spacecraft's path never occurred, delaying the docking. The American and two Russians on board were not in danger.

Since the space shuttle's retirement, NASA has relied on the Russians to ferry astronauts. It's paying two private companies including SpaceX to transport cargo and eventually astronauts.

NASA says SpaceX's fourth supply run to the set for Sunday has been postponed because of a problem at the launch site.

Explore further: Snag delays arrival of crew at space station

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Returners
not rated yet Mar 27, 2014
Has anybody thought about the fact that if we have another Cold War with Russia over this Crimea incident, some of our astronauts might be held hostage?

Do we have any civilian astronauts on this trip?
JohnGee
not rated yet Mar 27, 2014
At least they aren't orbiting Jupiter. (2010 reference)