New lizard species discovered in Peru

March 12, 2014

Scientists have discovered a new species of lizard at a national park in Peru, experts said on Tuesday.

The , named Potamites erythrocularis, was located in the upper part of Manu National Park in Peru's southeast Cusco region, the environmental ministry said.

The new species "differs from the others by having messy keeled scales on the back, undivided frontonasal scales, a red ring around the eye in males and absence of femoral pores in females," it said.

The research was led by scientists Alessandro Catenazzi and German Chavez and a team of biologists and rangers of the Manu National Park, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The tropical forest in the lower tiers is home to an unrivaled variety of animal and plant species, according to the United Nations.

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