Studying the behaviour of steel tubes filled with concrete foam

Mar 31, 2014 by Darmarajah Nadarajah

UiTM researchers have found that steel tubes filled with foam concrete was inferior in strength as compared to that of normal concrete.

A team of researchers from the Faculty of Civil Engineering, UiTM, studied the use of foam as infill for steel tubes that were used in construction.

Concrete-filled steel tube (CFST) structure is a composite structure and consists of a steel tube that is filled up with concrete. There are many advantages of using composite structure as compared to conventional reinforced concrete (RC) structure and steel structure. Steel tubes infilled with composite foam concrete are cheaper and it is easier to use in construction. The application of this composite structure has become increasingly popular in structural applications.

However, the use of foamed concrete as infilled material is rare and has not been studied comprehensively. Thus, this research was conducted to investigate the strength and structural behaviour of CFSTs filled with different densities of foamed concrete and with different replacement levels of Waste Paper Ash (WPSA) to cement by weight under axial (compression) loading.

All CFST column specimens were loaded on the entire surface of the CFST column specimens under axial loading. The results of the experiment showed that the series contained different densities of the foamed concrete failed at loads less than 90% of the analytical values.

It also appears that the ultimate strength of the CFST specimens mainly depends upon the strength of the infill material. The study found that the CFST specimen that is infilled with concrete attain higher strength than those of without infilled concrete.

It was found that the CFST that was infilled with foam concrete was notably inferior in strength as compared to that of normal concrete. However, higher of CFST is achieved when higher density of foamed concrete is adopted as infilled material.

Explore further: Firm combines 3-D printing with ancient foundry method

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Speedy analysis of steel fiber reinforced concrete

Nov 04, 2013

Concrete is the world's most popular building material: We use it to bridge rivers and valleys, build walls and line tunnels. The most common form of concrete is steel reinforced – a principle that will ...

Concrete which can heal its own cracks

Sep 16, 2013

Cardiff University researcher Dr Diane Gardner has won the 'You Heard It Here First' event at the British Science Festival for her work on self-healing concrete. The award considers the UK's brightest early ...

Limestone powder enhances performance of 'green' concrete

Sep 04, 2013

Adding limestone powder to "green" concrete mixtures—those containing substantial amounts of fly ash, a byproduct of coal-burning power plants—can significantly improve performance, report researchers from the National ...

What floats these boats? Concrete

Jun 24, 2013

Does concrete float? For the hundreds of civil engineering students at the annual National Concrete Canoe Competition, the answer is "yes."

Recommended for you

Firm combines 3-D printing with ancient foundry method

Mar 27, 2015

A century-old firm that's done custom metal work for some of the nation's most prestigious buildings has combined 3-D printing and an ancient foundry process for a project at the National Archives Building in Washington, ...

Wearable device helps vision-impaired avoid collision

Mar 26, 2015

People who have lost some of their peripheral vision, such as those with retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, or brain injury that causes half visual field loss, often face mobility challenges and increased likelihood ...

Applications of optical fibre for sensors

Mar 26, 2015

Mikel Bravo-Acha's PhD thesis has focused on the applications of optical fibre as a sensor. In the course of his research, conducted at the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre, he monitored a sensor fitted to optical fibre ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.