Studying the behaviour of steel tubes filled with concrete foam

March 31, 2014 by Darmarajah Nadarajah

UiTM researchers have found that steel tubes filled with foam concrete was inferior in strength as compared to that of normal concrete.

A team of researchers from the Faculty of Civil Engineering, UiTM, studied the use of foam as infill for steel tubes that were used in construction.

Concrete-filled steel tube (CFST) structure is a composite structure and consists of a steel tube that is filled up with concrete. There are many advantages of using composite structure as compared to conventional reinforced concrete (RC) structure and steel structure. Steel tubes infilled with composite foam concrete are cheaper and it is easier to use in construction. The application of this composite structure has become increasingly popular in structural applications.

However, the use of foamed concrete as infilled material is rare and has not been studied comprehensively. Thus, this research was conducted to investigate the strength and structural behaviour of CFSTs filled with different densities of foamed concrete and with different replacement levels of Waste Paper Ash (WPSA) to cement by weight under axial (compression) loading.

All CFST column specimens were loaded on the entire surface of the CFST column specimens under axial loading. The results of the experiment showed that the series contained different densities of the foamed concrete failed at loads less than 90% of the analytical values.

It also appears that the ultimate strength of the CFST specimens mainly depends upon the strength of the infill material. The study found that the CFST specimen that is infilled with concrete attain higher strength than those of without infilled concrete.

It was found that the CFST that was infilled with foam concrete was notably inferior in strength as compared to that of normal concrete. However, higher of CFST is achieved when higher density of foamed concrete is adopted as infilled material.

Explore further: Scientists test blast-resistant concrete

Related Stories

What floats these boats? Concrete

June 24, 2013

Does concrete float? For the hundreds of civil engineering students at the annual National Concrete Canoe Competition, the answer is "yes."

Limestone powder enhances performance of 'green' concrete

September 4, 2013

Adding limestone powder to "green" concrete mixtures—those containing substantial amounts of fly ash, a byproduct of coal-burning power plants—can significantly improve performance, report researchers from the National ...

Concrete which can heal its own cracks

September 16, 2013

Cardiff University researcher Dr Diane Gardner has won the 'You Heard It Here First' event at the British Science Festival for her work on self-healing concrete. The award considers the UK's brightest early career researchers ...

Speedy analysis of steel fiber reinforced concrete

November 4, 2013

Concrete is the world's most popular building material: We use it to bridge rivers and valleys, build walls and line tunnels. The most common form of concrete is steel reinforced – a principle that will be familiar to anyone ...

Recommended for you

Smart home heating and cooling

August 28, 2015

Smart temperature-control devices—such as thermostats that learn and adjust to pre-programmed temperatures—are poised to increase comfort and save energy in homes.

Smallest 3-D camera offers brain surgery innovation

August 28, 2015

To operate on the brain, doctors need to see fine details on a small scale. A tiny camera that could produce 3-D images from inside the brain would help surgeons see more intricacies of the tissue they are handling and lead ...

Team creates functional ultrathin solar cells

August 27, 2015

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Johannes Kepler University Linz in Austria has developed an ultrathin solar cell for use in lightweight and flexible applications. In their paper published in the journal Nature Materials, ...

Interactive tool lifts veil on the cost of nuclear energy

August 24, 2015

Despite the ever-changing landscape of energy economics, subject to the influence of new technologies and geopolitics, a new tool promises to root discussions about the cost of nuclear energy in hard evidence rather than ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.