Tropical Storm Kajiki fades over South China Sea

Feb 03, 2014 by Rob Gutro
On Jan. 31 at 04:45 UTC, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Kajiki making landfall in Visayas, Philippines. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

NASA's Aqua satellite captured one of the last images of Tropical Storm Kajiki as it began moving over the central Philippines on Jan. 31. The storm, known locally as Basyang, dissipated over the South China Sea today, Feb. 3.

On January 31 at 04:45 UTC/Jan. 30 at 11:45 p.m. EST, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer known as the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a of Tropical Storm Kajiki. At the time Aqua was flying over the storm, it was making landfall in the Visayas region of the Philippines.

On February 1 at 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final bulletin on Kajiki. By that time, Kajiki had weakened to a depression and had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 kph. It was located about 171 nautical miles/196.8 miles/316.7 km south of Manila, Philippines, near 11.8 north latitude and 121.5 east longitude. At that time the depression was moving over Palawan. Palawan is an island province of the Philippines in the South China Sea.

According to the Philippine Star, a passenger ship sank off of Camotes Island, Cebu killing one crewmember. Tropical Storm Kajiki displaced over 18,000 people into shelters.

Kajiki dissipated on February 3, 2014 in the South China Sea.

Explore further: NASA catches Tropical Depression Kajiki over central Philippines

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA satellite catches a wide-eyed Typhoon Krosa

Nov 01, 2013

Typhoon Krosa became wide-eyed in imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite as the storm moved past the Philippines and into the South China Sea. Krosa re-strengthened after it passed over the northern Philippines ...

NASA sees Tropical Storm Krosa approach the Philippines

Oct 30, 2013

NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites captured visible and infrared data on intensifying Tropical Storm Krosa as it heads for a landfall in the northern Philippines. Krosa is known as "Vinta" in the Philippines.

Recommended for you

NASA radar system surveys Napa Valley quake area

4 hours ago

NASA scientists are conducting an airborne survey of earthquake fault displacements in the Napa Valley area of Northern California using a sophisticated radar system developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, ...

Aging Africa

Aug 29, 2014

In the September issue of GSA Today, Paul Bierman of the University of Vermont–Burlington and colleagues present a cosmogenic view of erosion, relief generation, and the age of faulting in southernmost Africa ...

NASA animation shows Hurricane Marie winding down

Aug 29, 2014

NOAA's GOES-West satellite keeps a continuous eye on the Eastern Pacific and has been covering Hurricane Marie since birth. NASA's GOES Project uses NOAA data and creates animations and did so to show the end of Hurricane ...

User comments : 0