Sonic undergoes makeover for new game, TV series

Feb 06, 2014 by Derrik J. Lang
This photo provided by OuiDO Productions shows the character Tails in a scene from the TV series, "Sonic Boom." (AP Photo/OuiDO Productions)

The conference room inside Big Red Button Entertainment's offices would look unremarkable if it weren't for the vibrant panoramas of a cartoony, tree-filled world plastered next to portraits of colorful creatures and robots on the walls. At first glance, one of the critters looks like Sonic the Hedgehog—if he donned a brown scarf and sport tape around his appendages.

But it's not a blur. Or a shadow. That's indeed the intrepid new look of the iconic character, who originally raced into gamers' hearts in 1991 as the star of the fast-paced side-scroller "Sonic the Hedgehog" before becoming the face of maker Sega. The latest makeover of Sonic isn't simply about accessorizing the 22-year-old character with new gear.

It's part of a "Sonic" revolution.

Sonic and his three pals—tinkering fox Tails, brutish echidna Knuckles and hammer-wielding hedgehog Amy—are starring together in a new Nintendo 3DS and Wii U game, as well as a Cartoon Network series set for release later this year, called "Sonic Boom." The games and TV series will share the new style, voice actors, locales, storylines and more. The collaborative take on "Sonic" will extend to merchandising, too.

"We're looking at this more than just a video game," said Marcella Churchill, senior marketing director of Sega of America. "Yes, Sega is primarily a video game company, but Sonic is a very viable character for us. We're always looking for new ways to expand the franchise, and we knew we wanted to grow the appeal of Sonic and reach many different touch points."

In this Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 photo, "Sonic Boom" lead character artist Daniel Ramirez Guardon works on a character from the new Sonic the Hedgehog video game at Big Red Button Entertainment's offices in El Segundo, Calif. Sega's speedy 22-year-old mascot and his friends are getting makeovers for the upcoming game and Cartoon Network series of the same name. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

Churchill expects innovations on both the game and TV show formats to draw new fans, not only gamers nostalgic for the ring-hording hedgehog. For example, the TV series will forgo old-school cartoon cheesiness to instead blend action and comedy together, while the game will feature more open-world exploration than in Sonic's previous interactive escapades.

With split-screen, four-player functionality, the game—the third in Sega's deal to exclusively release "Sonic" titles on Nintendo platforms—serves as a prequel to the cartoon, the first "Sonic" series to be computer animated. Both the game and the TV series, which is being created by OuiDO Productions, will deeper emphasize the characters' personalities and teamwork.

The focus on Sonic's crew inspired the developers, animators and everyone else working on "Sonic Boom" to make each hero distinct, in both form and function. In the case of Knuckles, that meant putting the once Sonic-sized sidekick through puberty—not steroids—in an effort to make the burly red echidna stand out from the pack, as well as pack a punch.

This photo provided by Sega shows characters from the Wii U video game, "Sonic Boom." (AP Photo/Sega)

However, the creators are quick to note that the sportier, teenaged rendition of Sonic and his team doesn't erase the depictions from four previous TV series and more than 70 games. "Sonic Boom" is merely a new branch of the "Sonic" universe with sensibilities they hope will appeal to modern youngsters who expect their entertainment to cohesively cross screens.

"When you have a franchise with the depth and fan base of this one, you can have more than one incarnation existing side by side," said Evan Bailey, executive producer of the TV show. "Look at Batman or Mickey Mouse. There are many iconic characters with more than one rendition and none is the definitive take, so hopefully fans don't firebomb our houses."

In this Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 photo, Big Red Button Entertainment quality assurance tester Amanda Rose plays the new Sonic the Hedgehog video game "Sonic Boom" in El Segundo, Calif. Sega's speedy 22-year-old mascot and his friends are getting makeovers for the upcoming game and Cartoon Network series of the same name. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

Unintentionally, "Sonic Boom" has become the franchise's biggest multicultural effort to date, with game developers and executives in California working in tandem with TV executives based out of New York, as well as animators in France, on a new iteration of a blue hedgehog born in Japan. Initially, however, the biggest barrier in crafting this Sonic wasn't language.

"Before we first met, we're thinking, 'Oh, boy. TV people," said Bob Rafei, CEO of Big Red Button. "They're gonna want to change everything. They're not going to understand games. To my surprise, Evan actually plays more games than I do. I don't know where he finds the time, but he understands the fundamental differences of mechanics and fiction."

In this Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 photo, Big Red Button Entertainment CEO Bob Rafei discusses the makeover of Sonic the Hedgehog and friends for the upcoming "Sonic Boom" video game at the studio's offices in El Segundo, Calif. Sega's speedy 22-year-old mascot and his friends are receiving a new look for the game and a Cartoon Network series of the same name. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

Rafei, who previously worked on such landmark game franchises as "Crash Bandicoot" and "Jak and Daxter" at Naughty Dog, noted the most challenging aspect of taking on a "Sonic" game was illustrating the character's signature speed without sacrificing new gameplay elements. The other major issue? Figuring out just what the heck Sonic is allowed to wear.

This photo provided by OuiDO Productions shows the character Sonic the Hedgehog in a scene from the TV series, "Sonic Boom." (AP Photo/OuiDO Productions)

"The clothing argument was a big one," said Rafei, leaning back in his chair in Big Red Button's conference room. "The most surreal moment in my life occurred when I was conveying with passion through a translator to the 'Sonic' team in Japan why Sonic needed to wear pants. Looking back at it, I'm glad they didn't go for it. Sonic wouldn't really be Sonic with pants on."

Explore further: 'Sonic' video games coming to Nintendo

More information: www.sonicthehedgehog.com

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