SESAME breathes new life into LEP cavities

Feb 06, 2014 by Abha Eli Phoboo
These radiofrequency cavities, built for the Large Electron-Positron Collider at CERN, will be re-used for training on the SESAME project. Credit: Sohail Janjua

The 27-kilometre ring that today houses the Large Hadron Collider was originally built for its predecessor, the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP). LEP is still the most powerful lepton accelerator ever built.

When it started up in 1989, there were 128 copper radiofrequency cavities positioned inside the LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. Radiofrequency cavities are metallic chambers containing an that accelerated the particles in the beams.

Today, these cavities are no longer in use inside the ring. Instead, some have found new life as material for training, experiment, and display purposes.

"We will be using the cavities for accelerator and technology training to develop specific expertise, to be able to provide accelerator support for injection, repair and maintenance to the Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (SESAME) project," says Hafeez Hoorani, professor of Physics at the National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University in Islamabad, Pakistan.

Pakistan has just received five of LEP's cavities. Hoorani says he hopes that skills will help the South Asian nation develop medical accelerators, and in the future, to build their own light source.

Fourteen of the cavities will be sent to different museums in Spain, Norway, France, Denmark, UK, Hungary, and Poland.

Explore further: New method for non-invasive prostate cancer screening

More information: www.lightsources.org/facility/sesame

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researching niobium gilding in bid for better beams

Jun 01, 2011

For thousands of years, craftsmen have applied gilding, a thin layer of gold, to objects to enhance their value. Now, researchers at DOE's Jefferson Lab are using this same idea to enhance materials for accelerator ...

New 31-km-long International Linear Collider ready for construction

Jun 12, 2013

Today the Linear Collider Collaboration published its Technical Design Report [PDF] for the International Linear Collider (ILC) - a proposed 31-kilometer electron-positron collider that will both complement and advance beyond the physics of the Large Had ...

Recommended for you

New method for non-invasive prostate cancer screening

13 hours ago

Cancer screening is a critical approach for preventing cancer deaths because cases caught early are often more treatable. But while there are already existing ways to screen for different types of cancer, ...

How bubble studies benefit science and engineering

14 hours ago

The image above shows a perfect bubble imploding in weightlessness. This bubble, and many like it, are produced by the researchers from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland. What ...

Famous Feynman lectures put online with free access

15 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Back in the early sixties, physicist Richard Feynman gave a series of lectures on physics to first year students at Caltech—those lectures were subsequently put into print and made into text ...

Single laser stops molecular tumbling motion instantly

19 hours ago

In the quantum world, making the simple atom behave is one thing, but making the more complex molecule behave is another story. Now Northwestern University scientists have figured out an elegant way to stop a molecule from ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

theon
not rated yet Feb 07, 2014
What a touching story. So much respect, friendship.