NASA Mars orbiter examines dramatic new crater

Feb 05, 2014
A dramatic, fresh impact crater dominates this image taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Nov. 19, 2013. Researchers used HiRISE to examine this site because the orbiter's Context Camera had revealed a change in appearance here between observations in July 2010 and May 2012, bracketing the formation of the crater between those observations. The crater spans approximately 100 feet (30 meters) in diameter and is surrounded by a large, rayed blast zone. Because the terrain where the crater formed is dusty, the fresh crater appears blue in the enhanced color of the image, due to removal of the reddish dust in that area. Debris tossed outward during the formation of the crater is called ejecta. In examining ejecta's distribution, scientists can learn more about the impact event. The explosion that excavated this crater threw ejecta as far as 9.3 miles (15 kilometers). The crater is at 3.7 degrees north latitude, 53.4 degrees east longitude on Mars. Before-and-after imaging that brackets appearance dates of fresh craters on Mars has indicated that impacts producing craters at least 12.8 feet (3.9 meters) in diameter occur at a rate exceeding 200 per year globally. Few of the scars are as dramatic in appearance as this one. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

(Phys.org) —Space rocks hitting Mars excavate fresh craters at a pace of more than 200 per year, but few new Mars scars pack as much visual punch as one seen in a NASA image released today.

The image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a crater about 100 feet (30 meters) in diameter at the center of a radial burst painting the surface with a pattern of bright and dark tones.

The scar appeared at some time between imaging of this location by the orbiter's Context Camera in July 2010 and again in May 2012. Based on apparent changes between those before-and-after images at lower resolution, researchers used HiRISE to acquire this new image on Nov. 19, 2013. The impact that excavated this crater threw some material as far as 9.3 miles (15 kilometers).

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. HiRISE is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson. The instrument was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, built and operates the Context Camera.

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User comments : 10

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cantdrive85
1 / 5 (9) Feb 05, 2014
Why wouldn't they include the "before" image? It's also curious only the red dust would get ejected. Sounds like someone has some splainin' to do to reveal why this impact ejected blue and red DUST differently.
baudrunner
5 / 5 (3) Feb 05, 2014
One more thing for the Mars One project candidates to worry about. It would be a bummer if their little colony met with this kind of natural disaster once it was all set up and good to go.
barakn
3.7 / 5 (6) Feb 05, 2014
I could recreate this with a plastic tub, flour with blue tempera paint powder mixed in, flour with cocoa powder, and a marble. Not sure what your problem with this is, cantdrive85, but it's probably your usual cognitive deficits.
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (5) Feb 06, 2014
@barakn

check out the link with the hi-res pic

http://www.uahiri...285_1835

this also has an interactive google earth style map in the lower part of the page that shows a low res of the area in IR as well as elevation and visible... pretty cool, if you are interested.

dont worry about CD85 as even if you had posted a link or original pics of the before/after, they would be ignored (as that is what she does when confronted with valid proof and relevant studies), or there would be an EU dump filling the comments.
regardless, he will attempt to tie EU into it anyway.

Requiem
4.6 / 5 (10) Feb 06, 2014
Here's one that's NOT in false color. Jesus christ, do any of you people even read? Hell, you shouldn't even need to have read that this was false color if you've ever spent any time exploring the data coming out of pretty much any probe yourselves.

http://hirise-pds...owse.jpg
thatsitalright
3.7 / 5 (3) Feb 06, 2014
One more thing for the Mars One project candidates to worry about. It would be a bummer if their little colony met with this kind of natural disaster once it was all set up and good to go.


Might be the most humane thing for them, all things considered.
GSwift7
5 / 5 (5) Feb 06, 2014
Why wouldn't they include the "before" image? It's also curious only the red dust would get ejected. Sounds like someone has some splainin' to do to reveal why this impact ejected blue and red DUST differently


If you click on the "more" button just under the photo, it gives a little more info.

They didn't include the before image because you wouldn't see much. The before image was a wide angle, low resolution shot from the context camera. They only went back and took the high resolution image when they noticed a slight variation between the 'before' image and another low resolution image of the same area taken later.

The image above is color-enhanced, so the blue is actually a false color. The 'blue' material is actually not dust, but solid material blown out of the ground by the impact. You can also see a circle in the red (also color enhanced to be more red) dust from the shock wave of the impact.
geokstr
4.3 / 5 (3) Feb 06, 2014
One more thing for the Mars One project candidates to worry about. It would be a bummer if their little colony met with this kind of natural disaster once it was all set up and good to go.


With 89.5 million square miles of surface on Mars, the odds are quite good that this won't be a problem.
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (4) Feb 07, 2014
Jesus christ, do any of you people even read? Hell, you shouldn't even need to have read that this was false color if you've ever spent any time exploring the data coming out of pretty much any probe yourselves.

@Requiem
if you are specifically referring to cantdrive85... it may be a waste of time. CD85 usually doesnt read links and seldom comprehends science, especially when that science refutes his electric universe philosophy.

nice link though: good pic

if you check out the link I left above, there are some higher resolution pics as well as wallpaper pics with good resolution, if you are interested.
no fate
5 / 5 (3) Feb 07, 2014
Nice links Capn and Requeim. CD, by going false color and removing alot of the red spectrum from the photos, the blue lines are enhanced. This causes the ejecta to stand out making it easier to map and also theorize about the underlying soil composition.

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