Intelligent eyes for automation

Feb 06, 2014
Intelligent eyes for automation
Siemens is integrating new object recognition features into its optical identification systems. The solution is based on Simatic code-reading systems and extends its functionality with the help of the software Pat Genius, which is distributed to licensed customers. Code readers identify objects by registering patterns such as dot matrix codes and bar codes. Pat Genius goes a step further by evaluating the camera images recorded by the code readers and identifying entire objects or characters based on their shape. The picture shows the code reader Simatic MV440 in use in automotive production.

Siemens is integrating new object recognition features into its optical identification systems. The solution is based on Simatic code-reading systems and extends its functionality with the help of the software Pat Genius, which is distributed to licensed customers. Code readers identify objects by registering patterns such as dot matrix codes and bar codes. Pat Genius goes a step further by evaluating the camera images recorded by the code readers and identifying entire objects or characters based on their shape. Fields of application include quality assurance or the control of pick-and-place robots. The inclusion of this functionality in existing code readers is significant because it permits a straightforward integration of object recognition into industrial controls like Simatic, Simotion, or Sinumerik. The data can then be used to control robots, for example.

Object or character recognition systems are used primarily in automotive manufacturing, the electronics or pharmaceuticals industries, and in medical technology. In quality assurance, for instance, they are used to ensure that the correct number of components are installed, to count the parts in a package, or to check print quality and placement of labels. In production, information about the position of objects or the number of parts to be processed can be used to control automatic insertion equipment or assembly robots. In these situations, the data must be fed into the machine controls, and that is now particularly easy with the Siemens system.

Customers who already use Simatic code readers can simply install Pat Genius software to get the . Links to Simatic, Smotion, or Sinumerik systems are easily established via existing function blocks or configuration files. The system is trained by means of reference objects, i.e., the users show the system certain shapes. After this, the software can recognize these objects. It can then check whether they are present at a given location and correctly positioned, and it can identify symbols that are already known to it, such as warnings. Just as Simatic code readers are designed for high throughput in industrial production, Pat Genius supports up to 2,500 testing operations per minute for very rapid testing processes. Pat Genius can be installed on all Simatic MVV440 devices with firmware version 6.0 and up.

Explore further: Quality control of glossy objects

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Quality control of glossy objects

Jan 23, 2014

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a new machine vision system for quality control of glossy objects. The system enables quality control of complex products, such as bathroom mixers, tableware, ...

Crowd sourcing project to allow 3D scan-to-print web app

Aug 05, 2013

Technology to allow for printing three dimensional objects is evolving rapidly, making it difficult for some to keep up. It's also still relatively expensive. Currently, people who wish to print such an object ...

Automobile plants make more with less

Apr 12, 2013

Competition is fierce in the automobile industry. Worldwide overcapacity has created price pressures that are particularly challenging for manufacturers that are already having a tough time managing their ...

Mapping objects in the brain

Dec 20, 2013

A brain region that responds to a particular category of objects is found to consist of small clusters of neurons encoding visual features of these objects.

Recommended for you

Smart sensor technology to combat indoor air pollution

Apr 14, 2014

Indoor air quality (IAQ) influences the health and well-being of people but for the last 20 years there has been a growing concern about pollutants in closed environments, the difficulty in identifying them ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Tech giants look to skies to spread Internet

The shortest path to the Internet for some remote corners of the world may be through the skies. That is the message from US tech giants seeking to spread the online gospel to hard-to-reach regions.

Wireless industry makes anti-theft commitment

A trade group for wireless providers said Tuesday that the biggest mobile device manufacturers and carriers will soon put anti-theft tools on the gadgets to try to deter rampant smartphone theft.

Making 'bucky-balls' in spin-out's sights

(Phys.org) —A new Oxford spin-out firm is targeting the difficult challenge of manufacturing fullerenes, known as 'bucky-balls' because of their spherical shape, a type of carbon nanomaterial which, like ...

Gene removal could have implications beyond plant science

(Phys.org) —For thousands of years humans have been tinkering with plant genetics, even when they didn't realize that is what they were doing, in an effort to make stronger, healthier crops that endured climates better, ...