Four GOES-R instruments ready for integration

Feb 26, 2014
Four GOES-R instruments ready for integration
This is an artist's rendition of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) spacecraft. Credit: Lockheed Martin

Four of the six instruments that will fly on the first Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) were delivered to Lockheed Martin in Denver for integration onto the spacecraft bus this month. This marks the beginning of a new phase in the development of the GOES-R satellite scheduled for launch in early 2016.

The instruments are: the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI), Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensors (EXIS), and the Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS). ABI is the primary instrument that will fly on the GOES-R Series satellites and is responsible for imaging Earth's weather, oceans and environment using 16 different spectral bands. SUVI, SEISS, and EXIS together provide observations of the sun and space weather, including , solar flares and ion fluxes that can disrupt communication and navigation systems and create radiation hazards.

"Together these tools will improve NOAA's ability to observe weather from geostationary orbit in near real-time," said GOES-R System Program Director Greg Mandt at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "These deliveries, and the start of integration with the , demonstrate the continued strength of the program as it moves towards launch in 2016."

The remaining two instruments that complete the GOES-R Series Program payload are the Magnetometer and Geostationary Lightning Mapper. Both instruments are scheduled for delivery later this year. Once the instruments arrive at the Lockheed Martin facility in Denver, they will be integrated onto the spacecraft alongside the first four instruments.

Explore further: Important space weather instrument cleared for installation onto GOES-R spacecraft

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