Feds: Small Ore., Calif. fish no longer endangered

Feb 12, 2014 by Jeff Barnard

Federal biologists say a small fish in desert creeks of Southern Oregon and Northern California has recovered enough to get off the endangered species list.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday the Modoc sucker is no longer in danger of extinction, after nearly 30 years of recovery efforts.

The Modoc sucker is the second fish in two weeks proposed for delisting. It was listed in 1985 due to loss of habitat. Recovery efforts have focused on fencing livestock out of its streams.

The proposal goes through a 60-day public comment period before a final decision.

The action comes as Republicans in Congress are trying to change the Endangered Species Act to limit lawsuits and give states more power.

Explore further: Minnow to be 1st fish taken off endangered list

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Minnow to be 1st fish taken off endangered list

Feb 04, 2014

A tiny minnow that lives only in Oregon is set to become the first fish ever taken off U.S. Endangered Species Act protection because it is no longer threatened with extinction.

US mulls lifting protected status for grizzly bear

Dec 12, 2013

US wildlife managers on Thursday recommended lifting endangered species protection for grizzly bears in Yellowstone National Park, which, if approved, could open the way for them to be hunted again.

Recommended for you

Invasive vines swallow up New York's natural areas

17 hours ago

(Phys.org) —When Antonio DiTommaso, a Cornell weed ecologist, first spotted pale swallow-wort in 2001, he was puzzled by it. Soon he noticed many Cornell old-field edges were overrun with the weedy vines. ...

Citizen scientists match research tool when counting sharks

Apr 23, 2014

Shark data collected by citizen scientists may be as reliable as data collected using automated tools, according to results published April 23, 2014, in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Gabriel Vianna from The University of Wes ...

Researchers detail newly discovered deer migration

Apr 23, 2014

A team of researchers including University of Wyoming scientists has documented the longest migration of mule deer ever recorded, the latest development in an initiative to understand and conserve ungulate ...

How Australia got the hump with one million feral camels

Apr 23, 2014

A new study by a University of Exeter researcher has shed light on how an estimated one million-strong population of wild camels thriving in Australia's remote outback have become reviled as pests and culled ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.

Ocean microbes display remarkable genetic diversity

The smallest, most abundant marine microbe, Prochlorococcus, is a photosynthetic bacteria species essential to the marine ecosystem. An estimated billion billion billion of the single-cell creatures live i ...

Cell resiliency surprises scientists

New research shows that cells are more resilient in taking care of their DNA than scientists originally thought. Even when missing critical components, cells can adapt and make copies of their DNA in an alternative ...