Facebook throws in towel on email

Feb 25, 2014
The Facebook logo created from pictures of Facebook users worldwide in the company's Data Center, on November 7, 2013 in Luleaa, Swedish Lapland

Facebook, after unsuccessfully trying to get its users on its own email system, has thrown in the towel.

The giant told AFP by that it was giving up on email "because most people haven't been using their Facebook email address, and we can focus on improving our mobile messaging experience for everyone."

The company launched its email service in 2010, and in 2012 prompted an outcry by changing the default address for messages to users' Facebook addresses.

The project was seen as an attempt to be a "Gmail Killer," by getting members of the biggest social network to switch , but Facebook now admits it did not work.

"We're notifying people who use their @facebook.com email that the feature is changing," the company spokesman said.

"When someone sends you an email to your @.com address, it will no longer go to your Messages on Facebook. Instead, the email will be forwarded to the primary email address on your account. (People have the option to turn forwarding off.)"

The news comes just days after Facebook announced a huge deal worth up to $19 billion in cash and stock for mobile messaging service WhatsApp.

The deal bolsters the world's biggest social network—which has more than 1.2 billion members—with the 450-million-strong WhatsApp, which will be operated independently with its own board.

Explore further: WhatsApp to add voice to messaging service

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User comments : 2

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JimD
5 / 5 (2) Feb 25, 2014
Facebook has proven itself to be untrustworthy. It allies itself with the Federal Government by giving them access to private information.It applies capricious ban on people for what on the surface often appear political reasons. It changes its rules regularly. Its popularity is waning.
BSD
not rated yet Feb 25, 2014
The project was seen as an attempt to be a "Gmail Killer," by getting members of the biggest social network to switch email accounts, but Facebook now admits it did not work.


It was never going to work for precisely the reasons stated by JimD. I'm surprised Facebook didn't realise that.

Google is bad, but not as seemingly casual with security as Facebook.

That said, I've minimised my (Google forced) G+ to that of no public information and shut down all correspondence to it.