Report: 2013 wet, warm year for much of US

Jan 15, 2014 by Marcia Dunn
In this Sunday, May 26, 2013 file photo, onlookers gather along a flooded intersection in San Antonio. On Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2014, scientists from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say 2013 was the wettest year for the continental U.S. since 2009. The average rainfall totaled 31 inches, 2 inches above the previous century's average. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Last year was a wet, warm one for much of the United States.

Scientists say 2013 was the wettest year for the continental U.S. since 2009. The totaled 31 inches, 2 inches above the previous century's average.

The of 52.4 degrees Fahrenheit also exceeded the previous century's average. Yet it was the coolest year since 2009, coming after the 2012 heat record-breaker.

The number of billion-dollar weather disasters in the continental U.S. last year totaled seven, including deadly tornadoes and flooding.

Scientists for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA (NO-uh), compiled the information. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center released the annual report Wednesday. Next week, the group will release its global report for last year.

Explore further: Scientists warn Obama of marine life harm from seismic tests

More information: NOAA: www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/

1.6 /5 (5 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

The green lungs of our planet are changing

4 hours ago

Are leaves and buds developing earlier in the spring? And do leaves stay on the trees longer in autumn? Do steppe ecosystems remaining green longer and are the savannas becoming drier and drier? In fact, over recent decades, ...

Researchers connect climate change to food safety

6 hours ago

Climate change can affect our food safety in a number of ways. In a European study, researchers at Wageningen University and Ghent University (Belgium) state that there is often a relationship between long-term changes in ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.