US woman fights citation for wearing Google Glass (Update)

January 16, 2014 by Julie Watson
Cecilia Abadie wears her Google Glass as she talks with her attorney outside of traffic court in this Dec. 3, 2013 file photo taken in San Diego. The California woman believed to be the first cited for wearing Google's computer-in-an-eyeglass while driving says she was within her rights and violated no law. The case to be tried Thursday Jan. 16, 2014 in a San Diego traffic court could help shape future laws on wearable technology as it goes mainstream. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi, File)

A U.S. woman goes to court Thursday to fight what appears to be the first citation for wearing Google Glass, the computer-embedded glasses, while driving.

The case in San Diego could help shape future laws on wearable technology as it goes mainstream.

Software developer Cecilia Abadie is among some 30,000 people called "explorers" who have been selected to try out the device before the technology becomes widely available this year.

The device features a thumbnail-size transparent display above the right eye. The lightweight frames are equipped with a hidden camera and tiny display that responds to voice commands. The technology can be used to do things such as check email or get driving directions.

Abadie was pulled over in October on suspicion of speeding. The California Highway Patrol officer saw she was wearing Google Glass and added a citation usually given to people driving while a video or TV screen is on in the front of their vehicle.

Abadie has pleaded not guilty to both charges. She said she will feel like her rights have been taken away if the judge rules in favor of the officer.

"It's a big responsibility for me and also for the judge who is going to interpret a very old law compared with how fast technology is changing," said Abadie, who wears Google Glass up to 12 hours a day.

Her attorney William Concidine said the device was not activated when she was driving.

The CHP declined comment. At the time of the citation, the agency said anything which takes a driver's attention from the road is dangerous.

Legislators in at least three states—Delaware, New Jersey and West Virginia—have introduced bills that would ban driving with Google Glass.

Google's website contains an advisory for users: "Read up and follow the law. Above all, even when you're following the law, don't hurt yourself or others by failing to pay attention to the road."

Explore further: Review: First peek through Google Glass impresses

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BSD
not rated yet Jan 16, 2014
Her attorney William Concidine said the device was not activated when she was driving.

That is not the point. The device could have been active and a distraction to prime duty. That is to drive her car in a safe and competent manner.
Stephen_Crowley
1 / 5 (1) Jan 16, 2014
anyone wearing Google glass in public should have their device snatched off their ugly faces and smashed to pieces(AF least). Google equals NSA equals miscreants and Edward Snowden is a hero
Greg_1heather
not rated yet Jan 16, 2014
perhaps this is a personal stunt, but I can't help but wonder if covertly google is helping or encouraging her to do this. The legal bills alone just to explore of glass could be worn while driving could cost google millions but the only real way is to see it actually played out in a court and it costs google nothing. Does she have any affiliation with google other than receiving glass, any affiliation with the officer who pulled her oversetting up this circumstance or anyone else that would benefit from this court reviewing this case? Could this just be a fast way for google to get this tried in court and save them a lot of legal fees and time?
BSD
not rated yet Feb 16, 2014
There is another way of fixing the Google Glass problem, punching the fuck out of a wearer's head.

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