Web gets new neighborhoods with '.guru' and more

Jan 29, 2014
New online neighborhoods open Wednesday when a US company starts offering Web addresses ending in ".guru," ".bike"—and even ".singles."

New online neighborhoods open Wednesday when a US company starts offering Web addresses ending in ".guru," ".bike"—and even ".singles."

Donuts Inc. plans to launch seven new generic (gTLDs) and then roll out more on a weekly basis through most of the year.

In the mix initially are addresses ending in guru, bike, singles, as well as clothing, holdings, plumbing and ventures.

Donuts, based in the northwestern state of Washington, will manage the domains, letting website registry firms such as GoDaddy sell addresses to the public.

A new batch will debut on February 5 with domain suffixes camera, equipment, estate, gallery, graphics, lighting, and photography, the company said in a release.

"Starting this week, new, relevant and specific Internet naming options will be available on a scale never before seen," said Donuts co-founder and chief executive Paul Stahura.

"This is a unique opportunity for businesses, brands, organizations, and individuals to find an online identity that speaks precisely to their products, services and interests."

Opening the Internet to domain names that go far beyond .com, .net, .gov, and .edu has been heralded by Web overlords at the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) as the biggest change to the Web since it was created.

More than 100 new gTLDs have cleared hurdles to reach registries such as Donuts, and it shouldn't be long before Web surfers start seeing new online addresses popping up, according to ICANN.

"This is an historic milestone for ICANN's New gTLD Program and the Internet as a whole," said Christine Willett, vice president of gTLD operations. "The year ahead will be defined by new opportunities in a vastly expanding online landscape."

The first-ever non-Latin language website address domains are also on their way, according to ICANN.

Online neighborhoods with addresses ending in the Chinese word for "game;" the Arabic words for "" or "network," or the Cyrillic word for "online" were cleared last year and more were to follow suit.

California-based ICANN says the huge expansion of the Internet—with some two billion users around the world, half of them in Asia—means new names are essential.

There are currently just 22 gTLDs, of which .com and .net comprise the lion's share.

"We're seeing the biggest, most influential shift in online identities since it all started," Donuts' vice president of communications, Mason Cole, said in a blog post.

"It's been a long time coming but the new gTLD program is now a reality, and things are happening quickly."

Explore further: Chinese, Russian, Arabic language web addresses coming

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Seven new Web domains to be released

Jan 24, 2014

On the Internet, .com is about to get some more company. Seven new Web domains including .bike, .guru and .clothing are scheduled to be released Wednesday, the first of hundreds of online address extensions expected to become ...

Internet body to reveal claims to new online addresses

Jun 12, 2012

Participants in an Internet land rush will be revealed Wednesday when the agency in charge of website addresses discloses the list of applicants for domain names ranging from .web to .porn and beyond.

Recommended for you

LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

Apr 18, 2014

The career-focused social network LinkedIn announced Friday it has 300 million members, with more than half the total outside the United States.

Researchers uncover likely creator of Bitcoin

Apr 18, 2014

The primary author of the celebrated Bitcoin paper, and therefore probable creator of Bitcoin, is most likely Nick Szabo, a blogger and former George Washington University law professor, according to students ...

White House updating online privacy policy

Apr 18, 2014

A new Obama administration privacy policy out Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites. It also clarifies that ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

alfie_null
not rated yet Jan 29, 2014
.lots .of .hype, .but .what .is .the .point?

Seriously. For the vast majority, our interaction with names, TLDs, is through search engines. The actual names and TLDs of, e.g. web sites are not particularly important for finding the site of a business. Even for sites I know the name of, I find myself going to the site via a search engine.

I suppose for a small number, there's a vanity appeal (kind of like getting a vanity auto license plate). As for businesses, they probably feel a need to protect their trademark-like names under all the (ever increasing) number of TLDs. This latter source is probably the anticipated revenue stream.

ICANN, which I am assured is non-profit, gets $185000 for each of these new TLDs, from entities like Donuts Inc.

More news stories

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.

Health care site flagged in Heartbleed review

People with accounts on the enrollment website for President Barack Obama's signature health care law are being told to change their passwords following an administration-wide review of the government's vulnerability to the ...

A homemade solar lamp for developing countries

(Phys.org) —The solar lamp developed by the start-up LEDsafari is a more effective, safer, and less expensive form of illumination than the traditional oil lamp currently used by more than one billion people ...

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...