Video: Time-lapse Gaia

January 14, 2014

Soyuz VS06, with Gaia space observatory, lifted off from Europe's Spaceport, French Guiana, on 19 December 2013.

This time-lapse movie shows Gaia sunshield deployment test, the transfer of the Soyuz from the assembly building to the and the lift off.

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Explore further: Gaia star mapper to lift off from Europe's Spaceport on a Soyuz launcher

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