Video: Mathematician combines love for numbers and passion for sea ice to forecast melting

January 14, 2014 by Miles O'brien

People don't usually think of mathematics as an occupation that requires survival skills, but they might change their minds if they saw Kenneth Golden and his daring research team in action.

The mathematician has spent the past 40 years studying sea ice in the north and south Polar Regions. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), he and his team at the University of Utah are developing mathematical formulas to help scientists make more about how quickly will melt as our planet continues to warm. And, the mathematical methods developed from the research in these rugged places can be applied broadly, from designing stealthier planes to practicing better medicine.

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Explore further: Mathematics and climate change: Gaining insights into the nature of sea ice

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