Toshiba CMOS image sensor technology allows full HD video at 240 frames per second

Jan 07, 2014

Toshiba Corporation today announced the development of "Bright Mode", a CMOS image sensor technology that allows smartphones and tablets to record Full HD video at 240 frames per second (fps), the industry's highest frame rate. "Bright Mode" realizes high quality slow motion playback.

High speed requires a high frame rate with short exposure time, which results in underexposed images. "Bright Mode" technology secures double the exposure time by adopting interlaced video output, not the progressive output that standard CMOS sensors use. "Bright Mode" also employs charge binning, which doubles the electrical charge of each pixel, resulting in an image four times brighter than that from a CMOS sensor without "Bright Mode". The technology also realizes 240 fps equivalent Full HD video recording. Toshiba will also provide an interlace-progressive conversion program that enables users to offer high quality progressive video with low deterioration, without changing .

CMOS image sensors incorporating "Bright Mode" can playback high quality video in at one-eighth standard speed, bringing new dimensions to imaging.

Toshiba's "Bright Mode" technology contributes to a wide variety of video applications, such as high-speed recording slow motion video, and continuous shooting. Sample sensors incorporating "Bright Mode" will be available in Q1 2014.

Explore further: Toshiba launches 13 Megapixel, 1.12um, CMOS image sensor with color noise reduction

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Quantenna promises 10-gigabit Wi-Fi by next year

4 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Quantenna Communications has announced that it has plans for releasing a chipset that will be capable of delivering 10Gbps WiFi to/from routers, bridges and computers by sometime next year. ...

New US-Spanish firm says targets rich mobile ad market

5 hours ago

Spanish telecoms firm Telefonica and US investment giant Blackstone launched a mobile telephone advertising venture on Wednesday, challenging internet giants such as Google and Facebook in a multi-billion-dollar ...

Environmentally compatible organic solar cells

5 hours ago

Environmentally compatible production methods for organic solar cells from novel materials are in the focus of "MatHero". The new project coordinated by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) aims at making ...

Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

5 hours ago

Social networking company Twitter on Wednesday rejected demands from the Turkish government to open an office there, following accusations of tax evasion and a two-week ban on the service.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Quantenna promises 10-gigabit Wi-Fi by next year

(Phys.org) —Quantenna Communications has announced that it has plans for releasing a chipset that will be capable of delivering 10Gbps WiFi to/from routers, bridges and computers by sometime next year. ...

Floating nuclear plants could ride out tsunamis

When an earthquake and tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant complex in 2011, neither the quake nor the inundation caused the ensuing contamination. Rather, it was the aftereffects—specifically, ...

Unlocking secrets of new solar material

(Phys.org) —A new solar material that has the same crystal structure as a mineral first found in the Ural Mountains in 1839 is shooting up the efficiency charts faster than almost anything researchers have ...

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

How kids' brain structures grow as memory develops

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. New research from UC Davis is exploring ...

Gate for bacterial toxins found

Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Aktories and Dr. Panagiotis Papatheodorou from the Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University of Freiburg have discovered the receptor responsible ...