Tech gets in your head, literally, to ease stress

Jan 10, 2014
Attendees walk around the 2014 International CES at the Las Vegas Convention Center on January 7, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada

Yes, technology can get into your head, says the maker of a new brain-sensing headband that promises to reduced stress.

The Muse headband from Canadian-based Interaxon presented at the Consumer Electronics Show uses seven sensors, including five on the forehead and two behind the ears, to monitor and help people with stress-reducing exercises.

"It's based on neuro feedback," said company communications manager Gena Meldazy.

"The sensors detect and measure changes in your brainwaves." They then transmit this information to a , which enables the user to find ways to relax and reduce stress.

It can deliver results in just a few minutes, for example, "very quickly before an important meeting," Meldazy told AFP.

The system uses a series of training exercises designed to calm and focus the mind, helping keep stress under control.

The product is set to be launched in 2015 at a price of $269, with the company taking preorders at www.getyourmuse.com.

Explore further: Melon focus headband turns to Kickstarter for rollout plans

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