Seven new species of nearctic wasps described and illustrated

Jan 04, 2014
7 new species of nearctic wasps described and illustrated
This is Alloxysta texana Ferrer-Suay & Pujade-Villar. Credit: Entomological Society of America

After studying specimens from the Nearctic deposited in the United States National Museum of Natural History and some specimens in the Canadian National Collection of Insects, researchers have found 16 new species of wasps from the Nearctic region, and they've described seven new species.

The are described and illustrated in an article called "First Records, New Species, and a Key of the Charipinae (Hymenoptera: Cynipoidea: Figitidae) From the Nearctic Region" that appears in the latest issue of Annals of the Entomological Society of America. A key to identify the Charipinae present in the Nearctic region is also given.

Members of the subfamily Charipinae (Hymenoptera: Cynipoidea: Figitidae) are widely distributed around the world. They are mainly characterized as being a very small wasp, with a smooth and shiny body.

7 new species of nearctic wasps described and illustrated
This image shows Phaenoglyphis kenaii Ferrer-Suay & Pujade-Villar. Credit: Entomological Society of America

Specimens were studied using stereomicroscopy and a field-emission gun environmental scanning electron microscope.

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More information: Annals of the Entomological Society of America DOI: 10.1603/AN13077

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