Sony develops 4K ultra short throw projector

Jan 08, 2014
Sony's state-of-the-art 4K Ultra Short Throw Projector featuring a stylish, furniture-like design. It can be placed near most walls and has the ability to cast a 4K Ultra High-Definition image up to 147-inches, turning unused space into a display and introducing a whole new viewing experience in the home.

Sony today announced the development of a state-of-the-art 4K Ultra Short Throw Projector featuring a stylish, furniture-like design. Utilizing space itself, it can be placed near most walls and has the ability to cast a 4K Ultra High-Definition image up to 147-inches, turning unused space into a display and introducing a whole new viewing experience in the home.

As technology continues to evolve, so does the quality of the entertainment experiences in the home. With higher resolution images and better sound quality delivered across high-speed broadband, the feeling of a live performance in the home is closer to reality than ever before. By taking advantage of these combined developments, and adding in some Sony magic, a new user experience has emerged. Users can enjoy entertainment content without the restrictions of frames, boxes, or screens by utilizing space itself.

Movies, video games, sports and photographs take on an air of realism, turning what was once a blank wall into a large as life "entertainment window."  The beauty of the new projector is that it requires no special tools or construction to install and operate. Simply set it right next to a wall that would not yield any shadows of people into a screen, and plug it in to enjoy immersive, large screen, 4K Ultra HD images. Furthermore, unlike other projectors on the market today, it is designed to blend into a living space, as naturally as an console. It also has the ability to display current video content services from IP, satellite or cable providers as well as 4K content sources including Video Unlimited 4K, Netflix and 4K content shot on Sony's expanding range of 4K Handycam camcorders.

The 4K Ultra Short Throw Projector will be available in the U.S. by summer of 2014 for approximately $30,000 to $40,000. A prototype is being showcased in Sony's booth during the International Consumer Electronics Show this week.

Explore further: Panasonic unveils wearable 4K camcorder

More information: For more product information, visit: www.sony.net/Products/4k-ultra-short-throw

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