Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone 11P headed for Queensland

Jan 29, 2014
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this image of Tropical Cyclone 11P on Jan. 28 at 04:19 UTC, revealing a more rounded circulation than the previous day, and bands of thunderstorms over the storm's southern semi-circle. Credit: NASA/NOAA/NRL

The NASA-NOAA Satellite known as Suomi NPP flew over newborn Tropical Cyclone 11P in the Coral Sea and captured a visible image of the newly developed storm as it moves toward a landfall in Queensland, Australia. Tropical Cyclone 11P developed from the low pressure area previously known as System 99P.

The VIIRS instrument aboard Suomi NPP captured an image of 11P on January 28 at 04:19 UTC/Jan. 27 at 11:19 p.m. EST. The image showed a more rounded circulation than the previous day, and bands of thunderstorms over the storm's southern semi-circle.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology or ABM has issued a Cyclone Warning for coastal and island communities from Cairns to St Lawrence, including Townsville and Mackay. A Cyclone Watch remained in effect for communities through the eastern interior including Charters Towers and Moranbah. For updated warnings and watches, please visit ABM's website at: http://www.bom.gov.au

11P was passing near Willis Island, and according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC, the radar there indicated that the low-level center was better organized, but bands of thunderstorms appeared fragmented and loosely organized.

At 1500 UTC/10 a.m. EST on January 29, Tropical Cyclone 11P had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. It was centered 247 nautical miles/284.2 miles/457.5 km east of Cairns, Australia, near 17.1 south and 149.8 east. Tropical Cyclone 11P is moving to the southwest at 6 knots/6.9 mph/11.1 kph.

The JTWC expects 11P to strengthen to 50 knots before making landfall. The JTWC forecast calls for around 0000 UTC on January 31/7 p.m. EST on January 30 and the ABM forecast calls for 11P to cross the Queensland coast between Lucinda and Proserpine on January 31, Friday morning.

Explore further: Satellites catch the birth of two volcanic islands

Related Stories

Tropical Cyclone 04B forms in northern Indian Ocean

Nov 19, 2013

The fourth tropical cyclone of the Northern Indian Ocean season formed and is headed for landfall in a couple of days in southeastern India. NASA's TRMM satellite saw broken bands of thunderstorms with moderate ...

Recommended for you

Satellites catch the birth of two volcanic islands

3 hours ago

The birth of a volcanic island is a potent and beautiful reminder of our dynamic planet's ability to make new land. Given the destruction we've seen following natural events like earthquakes and tsunamis in t ...

Uncovering diversity in an invisible ocean world

4 hours ago

Plankton are vital to life on Earth—they absorb carbon dioxide, generate nearly half of the oxygen we breathe, break down waste, and are a cornerstone of the marine food chain. Now, new research indicates ...

Evolution of the Antarctic ice sheet

6 hours ago

ULB study sheds a new light on the stability of the Antarctic ice sheet. It shows for the first time that ice rises (pinning points that keep the floating parts of ice sheets in place) are formed during the transition between ...

Severe ozone depletion avoided

May 26, 2015

We are already reaping the rewards of the Montreal Protocol, with the ozone layer in much better shape than it would have been without the UN treaty, according to a new study in Nature Communications.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.