Personal drones launch in your skies

Jan 08, 2014 by Rob Lever
A DJI Innovations DJI Phantom 2 Vision aerial system drone is shown during "CES: Unveiled," the media preview for International CES, at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center on January 5, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada

It's not a bird, not a plane. But it could be someone's personal drone coming to the skies near you.

Some of the flying objects being shown at this week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas include items that are for play, personal photography and other uses which could lead to a market for the products.

The notion of personal follows widespread use by the US military and growing reliance by law enforcement on such aerial technology.

Retail giant Amazon meanwhile, has hatched a plan to create delivery drones, and French-based technology firm Parrot unveiled its "mini drone" toy which can be controlled from a smartphone.

"We have civilian drones and now we have toy drones," Parrot's Nicolas Haftermeyer told AFP, describing the Parrot drone as a device designed for teenagers who enjoy a challenge of using a tablet to direct the device.

While one division of the French firm makes fixed-wing drones for mapping and other purposes, this devices, which can be held in one's hand, is purely for play, says Haftermeyer.

"It has plastic propellers, they are not dangerous. With four propellers, it can balance itself automatically."

For more serious uses, Chinese-based maker DJI unveiled its line of flying devices which look a lot like drones.

"We prefer the term aerial systems," DJI's Gabriel Chan told AFP.

Designed for aerial photography, the self-balancing flying devices can access hard-to-reach areas and produce "beautiful cinematography," Chan said.

DJI's Michael Perry said the groups has established "a platform for any user to create amazing videos from the skies."

While most of the usage so far has been for personal photography and professional cinematographers, Perry said DJI devices were also used for search-and-rescue operations in the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan.

Perry said that in the United States, people can uses the devices to fly at altitudes up to 400 feet (120 meters) but that the Federal Aviation Administration is examining rules governing drones at higher altitudes.

The company offered a test flight of its Phantom 2 Vision which it calls "the world's first consumer quadcopter with a built-in high-performance camera."

The device can fly 25 minutes and send images and location back to a smartphone which directs navigation. It also is programmed to return home if the user loses the location.

DJI says the device can revolutionize photography by getting to places normally inaccessible, like the middle of the Grand Canyon, or close to sporting events. But there could be other uses, such as for disaster relief.

DJI has three other flying devices including one designed for professional cinematography and photography.

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User comments : 12

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Benni
not rated yet Jan 08, 2014
Finally, I'm gonna be to find out what my neighbors are hiding behind those tall thick groves of trees that they've endeavored with so much camouflaging to hide all these years, yeah, we'll see what they're really growing back there.
dav_daddy
not rated yet Jan 09, 2014
Finally, I'm gonna be to find out what my neighbors are hiding behind those tall thick groves of trees that they've endeavored with so much camouflaging to hide all these years, yeah, we'll see what they're really growing back there.


If you do that you would be more than likely breaking the law.

How serious of a charge you'd face will depend on which jurisdiction you fall under as well as things like if the area has gates/fences, any signage posted, distance from public/non-private areas, and largely what your intent was.
Benni
not rated yet Jan 09, 2014
Finally, I'm gonna be to find out what my neighbors are hiding behind those tall thick groves of trees that they've endeavored with so much camouflaging to hide all these years, yeah, we'll see what they're really growing back there.


If you do that you would be more than likely breaking the law.


Google skymap already does this.........all you can do is go for the opt out notification or Google can zoom in on you as close as they like. Haven't heard about anyone claiming Google has broken the law or that any jurisdiction anywhere in the country intends to go after them for it.

How serious of a charge you'd face will depend on which jurisdiction you fall under as well as things like if the area has gates/fences, any signage posted, distance from public/non-private areas, and largely what your intent was.


Tell that to Google..........

Zephir_fan
Jan 09, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Benni
5 / 5 (1) Jan 10, 2014
Tell ya Zeph, I've wondered the same thing. It's against the law to paint airplanes with a laser device or any projectile that has kinetic energy impact like your goose-gun. You do not have ownership of an equivalent area of overhead sky as defined by your property boundaries. This is tested law no matter what that lawyer above was trying to peddle.

I have every confidence this is a technology that will be used for intrusive purposes beyond simple survelience.

A mobile device easily controlled by a ten year old will in short order be used by the most nefarious among us for conduct never before contemplated. For example, you have no actual right to privacy just because you built a secluded deck at the rear of your home for the succinct purpose of nude sunbathing. If someone builds a residence abutting your property with windows overlooking your nude sunbathing fetish, you can't make them tear down the house or create a zoning law exempting only your house from snooping neighbors.
Zephir_fan
Jan 10, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Benni
not rated yet Jan 10, 2014
If was in season I suppose I could say I thought he was the goose or high flying duck. That's if they could even figure out it was me shot it.


You won't get away with trying that explanation, the drone will have already recorded you in the nude taking aim with your goose gun, your birthday suit won't count for much as camouflage of the type licensed hunters attire themselves in. By the way, you'll probably be cited for hunting "out of season", be fined & maybe go to jail.

But I don't know why anyone would be interested in flying one of those contraptions over or on my land no.


Come on now Zeph, now think about this a little more........You got an ex- spouse? Maybe your last road rage encounter & the guy followed you home? There are people out there filled with a lot of hate just looking to victimize someone for the most trivial of reasons.
Zephir_fan
Jan 10, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Benni
not rated yet Jan 10, 2014
.....the drone will have already recorded you in the nude taking aim with your goose gun, your birthday suit won't count for much as camouflage of the type hunters attire themselves in.


Why you think the Ira would be out with no clothes on?


It's hot there in Goosy Looseiana

By the way, you'll probably be cited for hunting "out of season", be fined & maybe go to jail.


But here in Louisiana they don't send you to the jail for out of season hunting. ... I'd pay that to see the Skippy's face when I shoot his mechanical goose, eh?

You got an ex- spouse? Maybe your last road rage encounter & the guy followed you home?


No, I just got me the now wife. Some guy follow me home he better come with something more than a mechanical goose, I tell you.


There are people out there filled with a lot of hate just looking to victimize someone


With the mechanical goose?


Could be more than a camera on it, these geese sometimes shoot back.
Zephir_fan
Jan 10, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (1) Jan 11, 2014
The only true purpose of a device like this is surveillance. Biggest customers would be government organizations.
Benni
not rated yet Jan 11, 2014
The only true purpose of a device like this is surveillance. Biggest customers would be government organizations.


.........public utility companies would be as big. There is a huge natural gas line & distribution center a few miles from where I live, all located in very hilly & heavily forested terrain. Also nearby the pipeline are huge powerline towers winding through the same terrain.

It is very expensive for two man crews in pickups, RV's & helicopters to monitor these areas for energy theft & foliage growth. A solar powered drone flying at 1-2 thousand feet would be almost invisible & could be mistaken by the unsophisticated as one of those high flying eagles so common around here.

Drones equipped with infrared sensory capability could monitor & track down individuals illegally tapping into energy systems. Recently discovered in our county was a pipeline tap that had been in place for over 20 years & probably made at night. Gooseguns won't reach these drones.
Zephir_fan
Jan 11, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Benni
not rated yet Jan 11, 2014
Recently discovered in our county was a pipeline tap that had been in place for over 20 years & probably made at night.


@ Benni are you embellishing the story mon ami? What county you live in to tell this tale? The google won't tell me where this happened. The Ira thinks you made that part up like the Returnering Lurker Skippy does from time to time, or all the time yeah?


Nope, I wouldn't tell you what county, you may be GOOGLing it for some nefarious purpose, for professional reasons I know more details about it than the media revealed. You can get GOOGLE informed about "Unauthorized Use of Energy" & methods used to detect it with related stories & prosecutions, in the meantime my advice is not to try it, nowadays we can catch it almost 100% of the time. In the meantime........that goose.... if you get it, it won't be edible.
Zephir_fan
Jan 11, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
skippy_skippys
5 / 5 (2) Jan 11, 2014
zephir_fan, ira skippy,... are you retarded? If yeah who is helping the ira with the computer typing? Is she using her palms or elbows? You's sounds likes you be got a second grade edmudcation.
Benni
not rated yet Jan 12, 2014
For those with concerns about your neighbor using camera laden drones overflying your property: You have reasonable expectation of privacy from physical trespass that extends at least to the highest elevation of a domicile, generally speaking this means a rooftop. "Reasonable expectation of privacy" may extend to some distance above that elevation but it's all a matter of how local laws governing the use of video monitors may apply to your specific circumstances.
Zephir_fan
Jan 12, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
dav_daddy
not rated yet Jan 13, 2014


Google skymap already does this.........all you can do is go for the opt out notification or Google can zoom in on you as close as they like. Haven't heard about anyone claiming Google has broken the law or that any jurisdiction anywhere in the country intends to go after them for it.

How serious of a charge you'd face will depend on which jurisdiction you fall under as well as things like if the area has gates/fences, any signage posted, distance from public/non-private areas, and largely what your intent was.


Tell that to Google..........



If you can't see the difference between a satellite image and snooping behind someones included property go climb a tree and start photographing your neighbors yard.

When you go to court try your "but why isn't Google here for their satellite images?" Be sure to duck right afterward as they will certainly be throwing the book at you.

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