Newborn monkey is a real mummy's boy

January 24, 2014

Pictured clutching tightly on to mum, ZSL London Zoo's newest arrival is proving to be a real mummy's boy.

Peeking out from behind mum Niamey's long black fur is a tiny Eastern black and white colobus monkey named Atlas. Atlas loves spending most of his time peacefully snuggling with his mother, but if any of his adoring family try to give him a cuddle he squeals and wriggles until he's back in mummy's arms.

Seven-inch tall Atlas, who, in keeping with the ZSL London Zoo colobus family-tradition of christening infants after parts of the skeleton, is named after a bone in the neck, and joins dad Radius, big sister Anvil, and brothers Maxilla and Bones.

Colobus monkeys are facing threats in the wild from , including being hunted for their fur and as bushmeat and Atlas is a precious new addition to the European conservation breeding programme for the species.

The one-month old infant will eventually lose his startling white looks, as his hair and features will gradually darken with age, and he'll grow to around 30inches tall.

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