Japan academics sorry for 'robot' cleaning woman cover

Jan 10, 2014

A Japanese academic society has apologised for the front cover of their journal, which used a drawing of a cleaning woman with a cable in her back to depict the idea of artificial intelligence.

The Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence (JSAI) was hoping to make "Jinkou Chinou (Artificial Intelligence)" more appealing to potential readers with a cover illustration on the first edition of the new year.

Out went the dense tracts of text and complicated diagrams that have adorned the front for the last few decades, and in came an attractive, doe-eyed young woman holding a sweeping brush and with a thick cable plugged into her back.

A red-faced JSAI admitted Thursday that its attempt to popularise its small-circulation magazine may have misfired and apologised for any offence it had caused.

"The front-cover design is not intended to discriminate against women," the group said in a statement on its website.

The design "gave... room for the interpretation that women should clean," it said.

"We deeply regret that, as a public academic group, this matter was not considered more carefully," said the statement issued under the names of the journal's chief editor and his deputy, both of whom are scientists.

The group noted, however, that is not an easy thing to depict as it has no physical form.

"The appearance of any future robot that uses artificial intelligence to perform everyday tasks is a difficult issue," it said, adding the society would continue to explore the problem.

The journal, which sells 3,000-3,500 copies, is published every two months and the January cover design was selected from about 100 ideas submitted to a public competition JSAI held.

No decision has yet been made on the look of the March issue, the society said.

While attitudes are changing, especially among younger people, housework remains overwhelmingly the responsibility of women in Japanese homes.

Explore further: Angry Birds: The rise of the machines

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Angry Birds: The rise of the machines

Oct 24, 2013

An EPFL team has won an international artificial intelligence competition with software able to reproduce a human-like way of playing the famous video game.

Expert: AI computers by 2020

Feb 17, 2008

A U.S. computer expert predicts computers will have the same intellectual capacity as humans by 2020.

How robots learn general skills

Jan 08, 2014

To understand ourselves better, Roby Velez researches how robots learn general skills that help them explore their environment.

Recommended for you

Cloning whistle-blower: little change in S. Korea

4 hours ago

The whistle-blower who exposed breakthrough cloning research as a devastating fake says South Korea is still dominated by the values that allowed science fraudster Hwang Woo-suk to become an almost untouchable ...

Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes

Oct 21, 2014

A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), evaluated consumers' choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing.

How the lotus got its own administration

Oct 21, 2014

Actually the lotus is a very ordinary plant. Nevertheless, during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) a complex bureaucratic structure was built up around this plant. The lotus was part of the Imperial Household, ...

What labels on textiles can tell us about society

Oct 21, 2014

Throughout Chinese history, dynastic states used labels on textiles to spread information on the maker, the commissioner, the owner or the date and site of production. Silks produced in state-owned manufacture ...

User comments : 0