Image: Satellite sees a Midwest white out

January 8, 2014
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis Chesters

NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured a Midwestern wintertime "White Out" at 2015 UTC/3:15 p.m. EST on January 6, 2014.

Blowing snow and intensely cold air created dangerous white-out conditions over the Midwest, particularly around the Great Lakes, where averaged -20F with a wind chill near -50F.

The GOES-East satellite is managed by NOAA. The image was created at NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Explore further: NASA sees the major Midwestern snowstorm in infrared light

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