Facebook buys Indian mobile tech start-up 'Little Eye'

January 8, 2014
Facebook has bought an Indian mobile technology start-up called Little Eye Labs, the first business deal in the country by the world's biggest social network

Facebook has bought an Indian mobile technology start-up called Little Eye Labs, the first business deal in the country by the world's biggest social network, the Indian firm said.

With Facebook users increasingly logging in from mobile phones, Bangalore-based Little Eye will help Facebook develop performance analysis and monitoring tools that provide data such as the memory and of applications.

"This is Facebook's first acquisition of an Indian company, and we are happy to become part of such an incredible team," Little Eye said in a statement on its website Wednesday.

Though neither companies disclosed the value of the deal, reports said industry estimates were around $15 million.

"The Little Eye Labs technology will help us to continue improving our Android codebase to make more efficient, higher-performing apps," Facebook engineering manager Subbu Subramanian said, according to The Economic Times.

Little Eye Labs, which says it was founded about a year ago "by a bunch of program analysis geeks", will now move its operations to Facebook headquarters in California.

Explore further: Facebook goes down in several European countries: company

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