EU cuts CO2 emissions for vans by 28%

Jan 14, 2014
Motorists drive cars on a snow-covered road on November 21, 2013 at the Vizzavona mountain pass, near Bocognano, on the French Mediterranean island of Corsica

European Parliament signed off Tuesday on new carbon dioxide restrictions for commercial vans that will slash emissions by 28 percent from 2020.

Under the rules, all new light commercial vehicles sold across the European Union will emit a maximum 147 grammes of CO2 per kilometre instead of 203 grammes as per the level set in 2007.

European Climate Commissioner Connie Hedegaard said the target was both "accessible" and not too expensive for manufacturers. The legislation will be reviewed in 2015.

Vans account for 12 percent of the European market for light-duty vehicles, which together are responsible for 1.5 percent of total EU CO2 emissions, according to the European Commission.

Light vans have a longer lifespan than passenger cars and weigh up to 2.61 tonnes empty and 3.5 tonnes when laden.

European lawmakers next month will vote on a similar scheme to limit CO2 emissions in new that has been held up by concerns in Germany, which has a powerful auto industry.

Berlin agreed in November however to the scheme to reduce CO2 emissions to 95 grammes per kilometre for 2020. German carmakers had wanted the date pushed back to 2024 but did secure a phasing-in period to satisfy their demands.

The EU has already set a target for average new car of 130 grammes of CO2 per kilometre by 2015, which would represent an 18-percent improvement over 2007 standards.

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Returners
5 / 5 (1) Jan 14, 2014
Vans account for 12 percent of the European market for light-duty vehicles, which together are responsible for 1.5 percent of total EU CO2 emissions, according to the European Commission.


Probably the only way to make that goal will be to cut weight by using lighter metals, most of which are weaker. This will potentially reduce the life-time of the vehicle, and potentially reduce the safety of the vehicle.

After all, there are physical, thermodynamic limits to what can be obtained by a combustion engine.

The improvement they are requiring represents a 28% increase in efficiency (as compared to current efficiency, not as a fraction of absolute thermodynamic efficiency).

The Shootist
3 / 5 (2) Jan 14, 2014
EU cuts CO2 emissions for vans by 28%


O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!' He chortled in his joy. `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves . . . this EU thing is laudable, why?
Eikka
not rated yet Jan 15, 2014
Vans account for 12 percent of the European market for light-duty vehicles, which together are responsible for 1.5 percent of total EU CO2 emissions, according to the European Commission.


So in other words, if they meet the target it will reduce total CO2 output by 0.0504% or 1 part in 1984 (how ironic)

Which means it has absolutely no relevance whatsoever to the big picture, and all that it accomplishes is to artifically increase cost to transport goods, thereby reducing the purchasing power of the people and diminishing their ability to actually do something about their CO2 emissions because the EU is spending all their money "fixing" the little things. It's like watering the flowers when your house is on fire.

Transportation accounts for 23% of the emissions, industry, energy and residential use is 71%

Has anyone taken a good look at how much more you need to spend in manufacturing the more complex car versus how much it saves in fuel over its lifetime?
Eikka
not rated yet Jan 15, 2014
Probably the only way to make that goal will be to cut weight by using lighter metals, most of which are weaker. This will potentially reduce the life-time of the vehicle, and potentially reduce the safety of the vehicle.


European car manufacturers already cheat in emissions tests by cheating with fuel consumption tests. The EU testing cycle works by placing the car on a set of rollers and driving it through the test regime with a certain amount of braking force applied that corresponds to the air-resistance of the vehicle at speed.

The trick is, they don't test for the actual coefficient of drag for the vehicle. They let the manufacturer say what it is and take that at face value, so the manufacturer simply lies. Or in case of hybrid cars the battery isn't being recharged during the test to get by with less fuel.

There's all sorts of tricks. It's like Margaret Thatcher and the Hello Nurses - when you make idiotic demands, people simply pretend to fullfill them.

vlaaing peerd
not rated yet Jan 15, 2014
@Eikka

Are there manufacturers that don't lie about specs then?

US cars weren't particularly known for fuel efficiency and this doesn't seem to be relevant selling point for the American car buyer. So the US car manufacturer wouldn't need to play with their fuel efficiency figures as a marketing tool, thus they don't.

And though I agree with you reducing only the emissions of vans is a drop on a hot plate, but it isn't the only measure, it's a pack of measures that is supposed to lead to a total reduction of carbon emission of 40% by 2030.

Every bit counts.
Eikka
4 / 5 (1) Jan 15, 2014
Are there manufacturers that don't lie about specs then?


Unlikely, but the problem is a bit deeper than that - the fuel economy tests don't reflect real world driving anyhow, so the results are rather specious, especially with high MPGs where small errors in measurement lead to large differences in numbers. The difference of 10 and 20 MPG is doubling of fuel efficiency, but the difference of 50 and 60 MPG is just 15% which is easily down to what sort of road surface you're driving on. (Hint: the test rollers are smooth metal)

And the disrepancy grows the more efficient the cars you're looking at, so on paper you may have a Ford van that does 85 MPG but in reality it's the same 55 MPG as any other small van of the same dimensions and engine size. The reduction in emissions becomes imaginary even if the manufacturers aren't deliberately cheating.
Eikka
4 / 5 (1) Jan 15, 2014
but it isn't the only measure, it's a pack of measures that is supposed to lead to a total reduction of carbon emission of 40% by 2030.

Every bit counts.


If you manage to reduce emissions by 28% across the board through all the transport sector, then I might agree with you, because you would eliminate 6.44% of the total emissions, but since light duty vans are already very efficient, this new regulation is just going to be ineffective and counterproductive.

Even comparing within the transports sector, the potential reductions represent a mere 2% of the total emissions produced by all road traffic, because private passenger vehicles and heavy transports are responsible for 80% of the emissions.

reducing only the emissions of vans is a drop on a hot plate


Not reducing the emissions of vans wouldn't actually make a difference in the end result because its effect is so small that it might not even exist.
Eikka
not rated yet Jan 15, 2014
http://blog.caran...-and-gm/

We assume that Ford, like most automakers, to a certain extent "games" the EPA tests—they ensure their cars can meet certain parameters of the test even if those don't have the biggest impact on real-world fuel economy. That's a problem with the EPA's regimen though, not a particular car company.


The story about the hello nurse is, that when Thatcher demanded patients to be recieved by the NHS hospitals within a certain time limit, in essence to prevent the sick from having to wait due to understaffing, the hospitals responded by not hiring more doctors since they didn't actually have the budget for it, but by hiring unqualified nurses to simply take the patients aside and say hello to them, and then leave them to wait for the doctor. Thus they were offically "recieved".

Same thing with cars and unreasonable demands on efficiency.

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