Ecuadoran satellite starts transmitting

Jan 26, 2014

A nanosatellite Ecuador launched began transmitting Saturday, and picked up a signal from another that had been lost, the Ecuadoran Civilian Space Agency said.

Krysaor "has started operating on schedule," the agency said, referring to the tiny traveler measuring just 10 by 10 centimeters (3.9 inches). It measures 75 centimeters when unfolded.

Weighing in at just 1.2 kilograms (2.65 pounds), the $160,000 orbiter was launched from Russia last year and is due to broadcast in near-real time for local educational uses.

Ecuador launched a similar satellite, Pegaso, in April. It ceased to be heard from in September after hitting remains of a Russian launcher.

But authorities said they also had recovered the signal from Pegaso after Krysaor began transmitting.

"Who would ever have imagined that we could launch Ecuadoran satellites, however small they may be! We are going to continue with our ," said an enthused President Rafael Correa, a leftist and economist by training.

Explore further: Ecuador launches first homemade satellite

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