Ыcientists discover gene regulation is dependent on protein ANP32E

Jan 23, 2014

A team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS), the Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (Strassbourg France), and the Institut Albert Bonniot (Grenoble, France) have made an important finding on how genes are regulated. This study will be released in the January 30th, 2014 print issue of the journal Nature.

The discovery used a genetically modified mouse that was developed by Dr Patrick Reilly, a Senior Scientist in the Laboratory of Inflammation Biology headed by Prof Tak Wah Mak at the NCCS, to demonstrate that the architecture of DNA in the living cell is maintained in part by a protein called ANP32E. The ANP32E or Acidic leucine-rich nuclear phosphoprotein 32 family member E is a protein in humans.

"While DNA is normally represented as a two strands forming a helix, the actual amounts of DNA in the cell mean that these strands must be compacted into complex structures, called chromatin, which restricts the DNA volume while still allowing access to the encoded information, " said Dr Patrick Reilly, a Senior Scientist at NCCS. Errors in chromatin structure are found in a wide array of developmental diseases as well as in all types of cancers. By understanding the processes controlling chromatin structure, we hope to improve our tools for timely regulation of specific genes, thus reversing the impact of many diseases and developing novel anti-cancer agents.

In recent decades, scientists have found that proper regulation of genes depends, in part, on these structures. In the study, the researchers in France began studying a specific component of chromatin called H2A.Z, which has been previously shown as important in controlling specific regions of DNA expression. They found that ANP32E, a protein that Dr. Reilly has been studying at NCCS for several years, had the ability to strip H2A.Z away from DNA, thus allowing altered gene expression. In collaboration, Dr Reilly was able to provide a mouse, which he generated to specifically lack ANP32E and together they found that cells lacking ANP32E lacked the proper chromatin structure. Since Dr Reilly is studying ANP32E as a possible therapeutic target based on its unusual composition, this finding could reveal novel therapeutic strategies in the long run.

Explore further: Important discovery for the diagnosis of genetic diseases

Journal reference: Nature search and more info website

Provided by National Cancer Centre Singapore

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Important discovery for the diagnosis of genetic diseases

Jan 16, 2014

A study conducted by Marie Kmita's team at the IRCM, in collaboration with Josée Dostie at McGill University, shows the importance of the chromatin architecture in controlling the activity of genes, especially those required ...

Unspooling DNA from nucleosomal disks

May 23, 2013

The tight wrapping of genomic DNA around nucleosomes in the cell nucleus makes it unavailable for gene expression. A team of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich now describes a mechanism that allows chromosomal ...

DNA-altering enzyme is essential for blood cell development

Jun 10, 2013

The expression of specific genes is partially dictated by the way the DNA is packed into chromatin, a tightly packed combination of DNA and proteins known as histones. HDAC3 is a chromatin-modifying enzyme that regulates ...

Recommended for you

For resetting circadian rhythms, neural cooperation is key

8 hours ago

Fruit flies are pretty predictable when it comes to scheduling their days, with peaks of activity at dawn and dusk and rest times in between. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports on April 17th h ...

Rapid and accurate mRNA detection in plant tissues

9 hours ago

Gene expression is the process whereby the genetic information of DNA is used to manufacture functional products, such as proteins, which have numerous different functions in living organisms. Messenger RNA (mRNA) serves ...

For cells, internal stress leads to unique shapes

Apr 16, 2014

From far away, the top of a leaf looks like one seamless surface; however, up close, that smooth exterior is actually made up of a patchwork of cells in a variety of shapes and sizes. Interested in how these ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

Within each strand of DNA lies the blueprint for building an organism, along with the keys to its evolution and survival. These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why pathogens like Cryptococcus ne ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...