Developers to get chocolate-like box of app tools

Jan 21, 2014 by Nancy Owano weblog

(Phys.org) —Diapers, monitors, thermostats, fridges, lights—whatever you want to imagine in the realm of everyday objects around your house may one day be a core part of the Internet of Things, smartened with embedded technology and gathering and imparting information. Application developers can expect wide-ranging opportunities to make a difference in the future gadget onslaught of the Internet of Things. A Europe-based startup called relayr intends to make developers' work all the easier with a product called the WunderBar, defined as a starter kit for the Internet of Things. "We provide the tools that you need to create great apps and services connected to the Internet of Things," according to the company. WunderBar is a set of wireless, detachable sensors and smart modules which can be monitored and controlled from your smartphone via the Internet. The kit has Bluetooth and WiFi and includes SDKs for Android, iOS, and Node.js.

Presently relayr is seeking funds, to get the product moving, by going up on Dragon Innovation, the crowdfunding platform that is focused on hardware.

"It is easy as chocolate," said the relayr video. "Just break off a piece and place it on anything you want and start programming." Chocolate is more than just a casual comparison; the design of the WunderBar looks like a bar of chocolate with break-off pieces. The WunderBar has a main module and six other pieces. Some provide sensors to monitor temperature, proximity, light, color, humidity, and movement. Another can control a home-entertainment system with an infra-red transmitter.

The main module is fitted with an ARM Cortex 'M' microprocessor; it uses Bluetooth Low energy to communicate with the sensor modules. All the activity that happens around the WunderBar is sent to the relayr platform, where the developer can access and work with the signals.

Relayr is on a mission: remove the hardware hurdles and give app developers an easy toolset to build applications for the Internet of Things. Toward that goal, the creators are also providing libraries, tutorials and demos to help developers start building apps that make use of the data generated by the sensor hardware. The idea is for app developers to snap off a section of the WunderBar to use sensors in locations where they want to collect data. On the crowdfunding site, the company notes, for example, that with a "Hello Thermometer" tutorial, "you can have your first Internet of Things App up and running in less than ten minutes."

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

After releasing the first prototypes of the WunderBar, the relayr team said they will upload their Eagle files—schematics and layouts—on GitHub. They said their APIs will always be open and they also said that, where possible, they will open-source their hardware too.

They are turning to crowdsourcing to help them bring their working prototype into production. The price starts at $149 and the target shipping date is summer 2014. At the time of this writing they raised $16,512 of a $91,000 goal with 26 days left.

Explore further: Bluetooth group ushers in updated Bluetooth 4.1

More information: www.dragoninnovation.com/projects/35-wunderbar-by-relayr

Related Stories

Bluetooth group ushers in updated Bluetooth 4.1

Dec 06, 2013

(Phys.org) —The Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG), the regulatory body responsible for the standard, announced on Wednesday its release of an updated version of the specification, Bluetooth 4.1. This ...

Recommended for you

Growing app industry has developers racing to keep up

14 hours ago

Smartphone application developers say they are challenged by the glut of apps as well as the need to update their software to keep up with evolving phone technology, making creative pricing strategies essential to finding ...

Android gains in US, basic phones almost extinct

Apr 18, 2014

The Google Android platform grabbed the majority of mobile phones in the US market in early 2014, as consumers all but abandoned non-smartphone handsets, a survey showed Friday.

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

Apr 17, 2014

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

Apr 16, 2014

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

TCS, Mitsubishi to create new Japan IT services firm

India's biggest outsourcing firm Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) and Japan's Mitsubishi Corp said Monday they are teaming up to create a Japanese software services provider with annual revenues of $600 million.

Finnish inventor rethinks design of the axe

(Phys.org) —Finnish inventor Heikki Kärnä is the man behind the Vipukirves Leveraxe, which is a precision tool for splitting firewood. He designed the tool to make the job easier and more efficient, with ...

Atom probe assisted dating of oldest piece of earth

(Phys.org) —It's a scientific axiom: big claims require extra-solid evidence. So there were skeptics in 2001 when University of Wisconsin-Madison geoscience professor John Valley dated an ancient crystal ...