Cat collars provide big benefits for low risk

Jan 02, 2014
Cat collars provide big benefits for low risk

A new study has challenged the belief that cat collars are 'risky', showing that collars can actually enhance
the welfare of our feline friends.

The study's lead author, Associate Professor Michael Calver of Murdoch University, said some owners are reluctant to put a collar on their cat, as required by new Western Australian laws that came into effect in November 2013.

"Some fear that their pets could be significantly injured if the collar became snagged on an object, or if a cat's teeth or paws were caught in it," he said.

Researchers analysed data from 63 in metropolitan Perth, 55 members of the Cat Welfare Society of Western Australia, 107 veterinarians from Australia and New Zealand (with a total of 1,588 years of clinical experience), along with records from four Perth general veterinary practices and one large practice that also treated 24-hour emergency cases.

The report stated that of the 4,460 individual treated by the large practice (covering general cases and 24h emergencies), only 15 were recorded as having collar injuries, with no deaths. Five of these were believed to be strays.

No collar injuries were reported at the other four Perth veterinary practices and only one veterinarian recalled a cat who had ever died from collar injuries.

"While many owners reported that their cat's collar had snagged on an object, or had caught a body part before, very few injuries resulted," Dr Calver said.

"The data showed that cats are far more likely to be injured in a road accident, or in a fight with another cat."

Dr Calver said that most collar injuries could be avoided by ensuring that a cat's collar fit properly, was in good condition and checked regularly.

He also said that the benefits far outweigh the risks.

"Identification tags attached to the collar are cheap and make it very easy to reunite lost pets with their owners," Dr Calver said.

"Someone finding a lost cat has only to phone the number on the collar, rather than go to the extra trouble of taking the cat to a facility where a microchip can be read.

"A number of safe and effective 'predation deterrents' can also be attached to a collar, which can stop cats from hunting native wildlife."

New cat laws came into effect in Western Australia on November 1, requiring that cats over six months old wear a collar and registration tag, are microchipped, sterilised and registered with local government.

Explore further: Poor owner knowledge of cat sex life linked to 850,000 unplanned kittens every year

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Returners
1 / 5 (3) Jan 02, 2014
"While many owners reported that their cat's collar had snagged on an object, or had caught a body part before, very few injuries resulted," Dr Calver said.
"The data showed that cats are far more likely to be injured in a road accident, or in a fight with another cat."


If you notice your cat is missing, you usually go looking for it, and find it hung up in a tree or on a fence, but because you found it before it got killed or injured, this is not representative of whether the animal actually would have suffered injury without further human intervention.

I have had cats as pets most of my life, and the times we have tried to use collars they caused problems. The cat would fight it and try to take it off, get caught up in their paw when cleaning or agitated by it. Also, in one case the cat was terrified of the collar and it nearly drove him crazy, aso we had to take it off. After these incidents, we quit even trying to put collars on cats, as it wasn't worth the hassle and risk
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.3 / 5 (3) Jan 02, 2014
Too bad we dont have the expert insight of that old poster pussycat_eyes yes? She also had a whole lot of nothing to say about everything.
The cat would fight it and try to take it off, get caught up in their paw when cleaning or agitated by it. Also, in one case the cat was terrified of the collar and it nearly drove him crazy
Perhaps you should look to acquire smarter cats.
If you notice your cat is missing, you usually go looking for it, and find it hung up in a tree or on a fence, but because you found it before it got killed or injured, this is not representative of whether the animal actually would have suffered injury without further human intervention.
I dont think cats get hung up on fences by their collars except for the very stupid ones. How long can a cat live while being suspended from a fense by its collar? I think you are making this all up pussyta- er, anonymous poster person.
Zephir_fan
Jan 02, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3 / 5 (2) Jan 02, 2014
Yeah I thought maybe lurker but theres lots of idle twitter-type chit chat and very little calculating
Zephir_fan
Jan 02, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Returners
3.7 / 5 (3) Jan 02, 2014
Perhaps you should look to acquire smarter cats.


Idiot. Our cats are "potty trained" to go to the door when they need to go. Unlike most cats which use a litter box.

I dont think cats get hung up on fences by their collars except for the very stupid ones.

I don't know why I bother replying to you.

Similar things have happened before.

You seem to think that accidents are somehow a measure of intelligence. That makes you a dumbass, because you are out of touch with reality.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2 / 5 (4) Jan 02, 2014
So qc if they had collars you could just hang them out by the door at night so you wouldnt have to let them out at all.
You seem to think that accidents are somehow a measure of intelligence. That makes you a dumbass, because you are out of touch with reality
No in reality I just showed you that collars can serve a useful purpose even when cats do not.
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (2) Jan 02, 2014
I've got a special kind of "collar" for cats.
http://www.addict...rcement/
dan42day
not rated yet Jan 03, 2014
New laws came into effect on November 1, requiring that children over six months old wear a collar and registration tag, are microchipped, sterilised and registered with local government.


It's only a matter of time.