Calculating waiting time at security control

Jan 17, 2014
Infra-red thermal imaging cameras and optical sensors provide an estimate of how long the queue will take to pass. Photo: Avinor

Thermal imaging cameras at airports could calculate queues and check-in times better than systems that make estimates using Bluetooth and WiFi on passengers' mobiles.

Current security control procedures at Værnes Airport use two infra-red thermal imaging cameras and strategically located to provide an estimate of how long the queue will take to pass.

Researchers at SINTEF ICT have been working with the company Detec AS to develop a passenger counter using these sensors.

Bluetooth turned off

These counters provide results that are more accurate than systems based on Bluetooth and WiFi. This is partly because many people often turn off these services in order to save power. Surveys have shown that less than 30 per cent of people have one or both of these services turned on.

Soft video surveillance

At Værnes, two infra-red thermal imaging cameras and strategically located optical sensors provide an estimate as to how long people will spend in the queue.

"The system, installed at Værnes in December 2013, is a soft type of video surveillance, from which personal identities are erased. You can view people's body temperature, but no other details", says Asbjørn Berge of SINTEF.

Learning about the flow of people

As most of us know, queues at airports are arranged in mazes using retractable ribbon barriers. Security personnel adjust the barriers according to the size of the queue, and the system automatically learns how the flow of people moves. This is then used to give an estimate of how long it takes for the queue to pass through security.

For several decades, SINTEF researchers have been working with Detec AS to develop advanced video analysis software that can be used to detect undesirable or threatening activity in crowds of people, or to secure special areas automatically.

  • SINTEF and the video surveillance company Detec have developed a new passenger counter.
  • The counter calculates queues and how long it takes for them to pass through security.
  • The project at Værnes has been developed in close co-operation with Værnes Airport and the local security company Bravida Norge AS.

Explore further: FTC settles complaint over hacked security cameras

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

FTC settles complaint over hacked security cameras

Sep 04, 2013

The government is settling with the marketer of Internet-connected home security cameras after feeds from consumers' homes—video from baby monitors and home security systems—were posted online for public view.

Controlling PCs and tablets with hand movements

Dec 12, 2013

SINTEF scientists are working to develop interaction between themselves and mobiles/ iPads - which does not require touching the display. They have been able to scroll through pages for some time. Now they ...

Targeted video surveillance in the soccer stadium

Feb 20, 2013

At the end of 2012 the German Soccer League's paper on safety was adopted. It envisages, among other things, improving video surveillance in stadiums. The second-generation Vigilant Eye System can help achieve ...

Recommended for you

Lifting the brakes on fuel efficiency

13 hours ago

The work of a research leader at Michigan Technological University is attracting attention from Michigan's Governor as well as automotive companies around the world. Xiaodi "Scott" Huang of Michigan Tech's ...

Large streams of data warn cars, banks and oil drillers

Apr 16, 2014

Better warning systems that alert motorists to a collision, make banks aware of the risk of losses on bad customers, and tell oil companies about potential problems with new drilling. This is the aim of AMIDST, the EU project ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

The career-focused social network LinkedIn announced Friday it has 300 million members, with more than half the total outside the United States.

Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years

(Phys.org) —Bits of plant life encapsulated in molten glass by asteroid and comet impacts millions of years ago give geologists information about climate and life forms on the ancient Earth. Scientists ...

Researchers successfully clone adult human stem cells

(Phys.org) —An international team of researchers, led by Robert Lanza, of Advanced Cell Technology, has announced that they have performed the first successful cloning of adult human skin cells into stem ...