BYOD mobile attack prevention app uses machine learning

Jan 24, 2014 by Nancy Owano weblog

(Phys.org) —Mobile security company Zimperium is introducing attack-protection software for mobile devices and they have designed the product to go where other malware-sniffing apps might not. They aim to attract today's companies increasingly involved in BYOD environments and BYOD security policy needs. Zimperium's technology, supporting Android platforms, takes the interesting approach of machine learning to sniff out and prevent mobile device intrusion. Based in San Francisco with an R&D center in Tel Aviv, Zimperium is calling its product zIPS, with an emphasis on IPS, which stands for intrusion prevention system. The app made to outwit attackers watches how a person's smartphone acts under normal conditions and it can identify what may be out-of-the-ordinary behavior.

Without reliance on signature detection, the app can find and prevent unknown threats, spear-phishing attempts (fraudulent email tricks), and network- and host-based attacks, according to the company. They said, "zIPS does not have to encounter any previously known kind of attack in order to protect your mobile device." What's more, "zIPS is capable of monitoring processes outside of its own sandbox, making it entirely dynamic and independent of signatures." What could look like a benign app could in time process to download mobile attack. Being "dynamic," zIPS can outwit the intruders. Rather than presenting the product for the consumer, though, Zimperium is targeting its product, for now, toward organizations that have the protection of BYOD security in mind. They will be leveraging this new chapter in business connectivity that reaches beyond desktop PCs into employees' tablets and smartphones used regularly for working at home and on the move.

Successful detection of malware on such is not easy. "Regardless of your bring-your-own-device policy," said the team, "not even the very best antivirus programs can protect a device from infiltration if the carrier for instance unwittingly connects to the same WiFi network as a hacker, opens fake emails or downloads previously unknown (zero days) malware."

The company was founded in 2010 by CEO Zuk Avraham, who served in the IDF as a security researcher, and Elia Yehuda, a white-hat hacker.

A report from analysts Juniper Research, announced in November, forecast that the number of employee-owned smartphones and tablets used in the enterprise will exceed 1 billion by 2018. The report also indicated that the threat from unprotected employee mobile devices is of significant importance. In October, Juniper Research, had announced findings that more than 80 percent of the total enterprise and consumer-owned smartphone device base would remain unprotected through 2013, despite increasing awareness of mobile security products.

Explore further: Improving the security of cloud apps accessed by mobile devices

More information: www.zimperium.com/

Related Stories

Phone charger can place user on malware alert

Oct 06, 2013

(Phys.org) —More smartphones, more smartphone apps, and more busy smartphone users downloading apps have become attractive magnets for malware agents. A new category has grown up, not just general malware ...

Recommended for you

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

4 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

Enabling dynamic prioritization of data in the cloud

Apr 14, 2014

IBM inventors have patented a cloud computing invention that can improve quality of service for clients by enabling data to be dynamically modified, prioritized and shared across a cloud environment.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

A way of making hundreds—or even thousands—of tiny robots cluster to carry out tasks without using any memory or processing power has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield, UK.

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump

IBM's first-quarter earnings fell and revenue came in below Wall Street's expectations amid an ongoing decline in its hardware business, one that was exasperated by weaker demand in China and emerging markets.

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.