American Peter Molnar wins Crafoord science prize

January 16, 2014

American scientist Peter Molnar has been awarded the 2014 Crafoord Prize in Geosciences for a groundbreaking contribution to the understanding of the driving forces behind plate motions and the place of continents in earth's evolution.

The prize jury said Molnar, a professor in at the University of Colorado, innovatively combined geological and geophysical methods of inquiry with and modeling and paved the way to a new understanding of the formation of and their role in global tectonics.

The 4 million kronor ($620,000) prize is awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences to honor achievements not always covered by its more famous Nobel Prizes. It was named after Holger Crafoord, the Swede who designed the first artificial kidney.

Explore further: Nobel chemistry prize to be announced in Stockholm

Related Stories

Nobel chemistry prize to be announced in Stockholm

October 10, 2012

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences will announce the winners of the 2012 Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday, capping this year's science awards before the Nobel spotlight moves to literature and peace.

British scientist wins top French prize

September 18, 2013

Margaret Buckingham, a Scottish-born biologist, has been awarded one of France's top science prizes, the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) announced on Wednesday.

Recommended for you

Who you gonna trust? How power affects our faith in others

October 6, 2015

One of the ongoing themes of the current presidential campaign is that Americans are becoming increasingly distrustful of those who walk the corridors of power – Exhibit A being the Republican presidential primary, in which ...

The hand and foot of Homo naledi

October 6, 2015

The second set of papers related to the remarkable discovery of Homo naledi, a new species of human relative, have been published in scientific journal, Nature Communications, on Tuesday, 6 October 2015.

Ancient genome from Africa sequenced for the first time

October 8, 2015

The first ancient human genome from Africa to be sequenced has revealed that a wave of migration back into Africa from Western Eurasia around 3,000 years ago was up to twice as significant as previously thought, and affected ...

From a very old skeleton, new insights on ancient migrations

October 9, 2015

Three years ago, a group of researchers found a cave in Ethiopia with a secret: it held the 4,500-year-old remains of a man, with his head resting on a rock pillow, his hands folded under his face, and stone flake tools surrounding ...

Mexican site yields new details of sacrifice of Spaniards

October 9, 2015

It was one of the worst defeats in one of history's most dramatic conquests: Only a year after Hernan Cortes landed in Mexico, hundreds of people in a Spanish-led convey were captured, sacrificed and apparently eaten.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

not rated yet Jan 17, 2014
riveting research with a spectrum of applications - this is truly worthy of $upport

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.