Top general to teens: Watch what you post online!

Dec 04, 2013 by Pauline Jelinek

If they don't believe their parents, maybe America's teens will listen to the Pentagon's top general.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey worried aloud Wednesday that the next generation of possible military recruits is ignorant about the damage that can come from online.

Dempsey says he worries that underestimate how the persona they present on Facebook, Twitter and other can hurt their future careers—their chances of being accepted in the military or getting a security clearance.

He spoke at a Washington conference on veteran treatment courts and the work they do to help veterans with addictions and other problems.

Explore further: Digital dilemma: How will US respond to Sony hack?

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