Survey finds binge TV viewers feel no shame

December 14, 2013
The majority of people who watch television online say they regularly indulge in binge-watching, and they feel no shame about it, according to a survey by Netflix

The majority of people who watch television online say they regularly indulge in binge-watching, and they feel no shame about it, according to a survey by Netflix.

Market research firm Harris Interactive quizzed 1,500 US adults who stream TV shows online at least once a week about their viewing habits, and the results confirmed a trend toward watching multiple episodes of a given show in one sitting. The survey was sponsored by on-demand streaming service Netflix.

Sixty-one percent said they regularly indulged in binge viewing, which nearly three in four respondents defined as watching two to six episodes at a time.

Seventy-three percent said they had positive feelings about binge viewing, and 51 percent said they prefer doing so with other people.

"The has awoken," cultural anthropologist Grant McCracken said in a statement.

"Binge watching has really taken off due to a perfect storm of better TV, our current economic climate and the digital explosion of the last few years."

Netflix delighted binge viewers in February, when it dropped all 13 episodes of the first season of its Emmy-nominated political drama "House of Cards" in one fell swoop.

Rivals took the cue, with Amazon.com inaugurating its foray into original programming, the comedy "Alpha House" starring John Goodman, with the simultaneous release of its first three on its video streaming service.

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8 comments

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BSD
3 / 5 (2) Dec 14, 2013
I don't even own a television, let alone pay to watch this shit.
Sinister1812
5 / 5 (1) Dec 14, 2013
I thought everyone owned a tv. Besides, who pays to watch stuff online anyway?
BSD
3 / 5 (2) Dec 14, 2013
I thought everyone owned a tv. Besides, who pays to watch stuff online anyway?


Australian commercial TV somehow manages to put 24 Hr, shit to air, 7 days a week across 4 main networks with about 4 to 5 channels each. If it disappeared tomorrow, I wouldn't be aware of it.

The ABC and SBS government stations are worth watching but still, I don't consider buying a television a worth it.

I easily get bored watching TV, I prefer to listen to DAB+ radio and go on the Internet.
Sinister1812
1 / 5 (1) Dec 14, 2013
Australian commercial TV somehow manages to put 24 Hr, shit to air, 7 days a week across 4 main networks with about 4 to 5 channels each. If it disappeared tomorrow, I wouldn't be aware of it.


Couldnt agree more. They have a few more channels now. But damn there's a lot of ads. But I agree, there's crap on TV these days.

The ABC and SBS government stations are worth watching but still, I don't consider buying a television a worth it.


Too true. Mostly news most of the time though.

I easily get bored watching TV, I prefer to listen to DAB+ radio and go on the Internet.


I agree, yeah same here. Never listened to DAB+ though, any good? And the internet beats watching TV anyday, and you don't have to sit through ads.
Sinister1812
not rated yet Dec 14, 2013
^ Sorry, just looked up DAB+. Wasn't sure what you meant.
BSD
5 / 5 (1) Dec 14, 2013
^ Sorry, just looked up DAB+. Wasn't sure what you meant.


DAB+ is OK. There are plenty of channels on air now. My favourites are the ABC, including Grandstand for the cricket. For music I tend to listen to either classical or chill. The three chillout channels are Buddha, SBS Chill and Koffee.

I recently acquired a Sangean Internet and DAB+ radio. Internet radio has thousands of channels. The only thing is, on this model, you can't get audio streaming like Last FM and similar services.
alfie_null
5 / 5 (1) Dec 15, 2013
Regarding any lack of commercials: The instant any delivery medium becomes popular, you will see marketing (which you might view as a juggernaut) will be there.

The thought occurs though, if viewers are spending all their time, days on end, watching back to back episodes of some series, they are not out there buying stuff.
alfie_null
5 / 5 (1) Dec 15, 2013
So my (ugh!) follow-on thought: on smart devices, the commercial breaks would involve loading some page from which the viewer could click-to-order whatever. Then back to the show. The stuff would then be delivered to the home. No need to ever leave the home (or the couch).

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