Integrated pest managment techniques can help manage the Bagrada bug

Dec 02, 2013
The life stages of B. hilaris are shown: (A) Newly laid eggs. (B) First instar next to unhatched egg. (C) Third instar. (D) Fourth instar. (E) Fifth instar with wingpads. (F) Adults in copula with the smaller male on left. (US penny used for scale.) Credit: Entomological Society of America

The Bagrada bug, an invasive stink bug, was discovered in the western hemisphere in 2008 near Los Angeles, CA, presumably introduced via container shipments arriving at the Port of Long Beach. Since then it has spread throughout southern California, southern areas of Arizona, Nevada, and Utah, southern and west-central New Mexico, and western Texas.

In an article in the latest issue of the Journal of Integrated Pest Managment called "Bagrada hilaris (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), An Invasive Stink Bug Attacking Cole Crops in the Southwestern United States," the authors discuss the host plants that the Bagrada bugs feed on, and the times of the year when their populations are likely to peak.

The artice also provides information on the insect's biology and host range in the United States that will facilitate the development of Integrated Pest Management strategies.

Explore further: Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance

More information: esa.publisher.ingentaconnect.c… 04/00000003/art00004

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