NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Amara spinning down

Dec 23, 2013 by Rob Gutro
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Amara in the Southern Indian Ocean on Dec. 21 at 0940 UTC/4:50 a.m. EST when it was still at cyclone force and had an eye. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

Tropical Cyclone Amara ran into wind shear, and dropped from Category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale to a minimal tropical storm on December 23.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Amara in the Southern Indian Ocean on Dec. 21 at 0940 UTC/4:50 a.m. EST when it was still at cyclone force and had an eye.

On December 23 at 1500 UTC, Amara's maximum sustained winds dropped to near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. It was located near 22.8 south latitude and 68.7 east longitude, about 657 nautical miles east-southeast of Port Louis, Mauritius. Amara was moving to the east at 5 knots/5.7 mph/9.2 kph.

Amara has ceased to qualify as a tropical cyclone and it is expected to become a remnant low pressure area in the next day or two.

Explore further: NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Amara's stretched out eye

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