The mathematics of forecasting

Dec 03, 2013
A 24-hour ensemble temperature forecast for Germany with eight different deterministic predictions Credit: HITS/Gneiting

Mathematician Tilmann Gneiting is leader of the new research group "Computational Statistics" at HITS and Professor at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT). His research focuses on the theory and practice of forecasts as well as on spatial statistics.

"Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future," the Danish physicist Niels Bohr said – probably; because this quote has been attributed to at least five people. Probability is also linked to predictions, especially for such complex events like the weather and the economy. Tilmann Gneiting deals with the mathematical foundations of such predictions. The mathematician has begun his work as leader of the newly established research group "Computational Statistics" at the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and W3 professor at the Institute of Stochastics at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT). His research group is located at HITS. The joint appointment reflects the intensive cooperation between the institutions. With Tilmann Gneiting and Alexandros Stamatakis (Bioinformatics), two HITS researchers now are professors at the KIT.

"The new group is an important element of our concept", says Klaus Tschira, who established the HITS as a non-profit research institute of the Klaus Tschira Foundation in 2010. "After all, the amount of data in science is increasing exponentially, and mathematical methods are essential for making sense of big data."

Tilmann Gneiting (47) studied mathematics and geoecology at the Universities of Stuttgart and Bayreuth and Boston University. After having received his Ph.D. from the University of Bayreuth in 1997, he held faculty positions in the Department of Statistics at the University of Washington in Seattle (U.S.), where he completed the tenure track from assistant professor to full professor. Gneiting, born in Backnang, returned to Germany in 2009 with the support of the Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach Foundation, and started work as Professor of Mathematical Statistics at the Institute for Applied Mathematics at the University of Heidelberg. In 2011, he was awarded an ERC Advanced Grant of 1.7 million Euro in support of his research.

Tilmann Gneiting's work focuses on two main areas: the theory and practice of forecasts, and spatial statistics. "There has been a paradigm shift from deterministic to probabilistic forecasting", Tilmann Gneiting says. "In weather forecasts, we no longer simply claim that it will rain tomorrow. Instead, we state how probable it is that it will rain tomorrow. While probabilistic forecasts might be inconvenient for decision makers, as they take account of intrinsic uncertainties, they get closer to the truth and allow for better decisions."

Scientists now frequently use so-called ensemble forecasts that comprise a collection of deterministic predictions, by running a predictive model multiple times, using modified initial values and process parameters. On the basis of the ensemble forecast, probability statements for future events can be generated.

Several years ago, Tilmann Gneiting and his U.S. colleagues created a real-time probabilistic weather forecast website for the state of Washington. These real-time predictions are available online at www.probcast.com. For this, Gneiting combined ensemble forecasts with newly developed statistical methods, feeding weather events of the respective past month into the computer.

"Many national weather services now use this method", Tilmann Gneiting says. He cooperates with numerous meteorological and hydrological organizations, such as the German Weather Service, the German Federal Institute for Hydrology, and the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts.

Gneiting also does research on economic forecasts. He currently works on papers concerning of economic quantities such as inflation rates or gross domestic product.

In his second research area, spatial statistics, Tilmann Gneiting and his research team create artificial worlds on the computer, which can be used to simulate natural features, such as wind fields or scenery. Using this "virtual material", existing data can be made visible, be interpreted and augmented. This thread of basic research has numerous potential applications, For example, it might support as the search for ideal locations for renewable energy resources.

Explore further: Developing better weather forecasts

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Developing better weather forecasts

Nov 01, 2013

By being more precise in what is uncertain, the weather forecasts will become more reliable. A new method for forecasting the weather is now being developed at Uni Research.

Improving flood predictions in developing nations

Jan 09, 2013

(Phys.org)—When deadly floodwaters devastated Pakistan in early September, Georgia Institute of Technology Professor Peter Webster and Research Associate Kristofer Shrestha weren't surprised. They had forecasted the disaster ...

Recommended for you

Magnitude-7.2 earthquake shakes Mexican capital

Apr 18, 2014

A powerful magnitude-7.2 earthquake shook central and southern Mexico on Friday, sending panicked people into the streets. Some walls cracked and fell, but there were no reports of major damage or casualties.

User comments : 0

More news stories

China says massive area of its soil polluted

A huge area of China's soil covering more than twice the size of Spain is estimated to be polluted, the government said Thursday, announcing findings of a survey previously kept secret.

UN weather agency warns of 'El Nino' this year

The UN weather agency Tuesday warned there was a good chance of an "El Nino" climate phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean this year, bringing droughts and heavy rainfall to the rest of the world.

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...